Welcome to the International Cartographic Association
Welcome to the website of the International Cartographic Association
Welcome to the website of the International Cartographic Association
Map of the Month 04/2014: Back in time feature on Géoportail
Map of the Month 03/2014: Tongariro National Park
Map of the Month 02/2014: Collins World Watch

Second Symposium on Service-Oriented Mapping 2014

The International Cartographic Association (ICA) and our host, the Hasso Plattner Institute at the University of Potsdam, is pleased to invite you to the Second International Symposium on Service-Oriented Mapping (SOMAP) in Potsdam from 6–8 October 2014.

Logo SOMAP2014

This symposium is coorganised by four ICA Commissions:

The call for papers is ongoing and registration has started at http://somap.cartography.at

Geospatial data and services are the main building blocks for geospatial infrastructures and fundamental to service-oriented mapping and realtime applications. Geospatial infrastructures make use of different paradigms: maintaining, sharing and use (instead of collect and own). Developments in these paradigms are leading to evolutions in availability and accessibility of geospatial data and services coupled with the added value of geospatial products and applications in the modern geospatial production environment.

Geospatial trends are constantly growing and developing such as sensor networks, realtime processing, volunteered geographic information, open governmental data, in-situ geospatial processing and striking visualization techniques creating many new possibilities but also new restrictions and problems based on massiveness, heterogeneity and contextual flexibility. Challenges like handling big data, aggregate different sources, standards for a homogenuous data, and disappearing sources/content are growing.

SOMAP2014 is a venue that brings together experts from research, government, non-governmental organisations, standardization bodies and industry to present, document and discuss trends in service-based mapping, which covers delivery, processing, integration, analysis, collaboration as well as visualization of geospatial data and services.

Markus Jobst
ICA Commission on Map Production and Geobusiness

Happy Open Education Week 2014

Open Education Week 2014

This week is Open Education Week 2014. It is a celebration of the global Open Education Movement with both online and locally hosted events around the world. Also geospatial science education is covered through the ELOGeo initiative.

ELOGeo was started with the aim to make geospatial science education available to everyone globally who wish to learn this. Till recently, geospatial science education was beyond the reach of financially poor students of our planet because of the high cost of the proprietary GI vendor softwares and non availability of good quality free education materials. We hope we can make a small step in helping widen geospatial education opportunities to all. We are extremely pleased that within two years since the launch of ELOGeo from very humble beginnings, it has now become the defacto Open Access Educational Platform for Geospatial thanks to the strong support of geospatial community worldwide. ELOGeo initiativeELOGeo is now used from Stanford University to universities in Africa.

A big thanks to all contributors, users and funders of ELOGeo!

Suchith Anand

 

Links:

“MDMD Mapping Fiction” — A Swiss cartomentary

“MDMD – Mapping Fiction” is an experimental short-film on cartography supported by the commission on Art & Cartography. The project is a mockumentary suggesting a secret research in the dark dungeons of ETH Zurich. One of Switzerlands most important cartographers, Prof Ed Imhof went out for an expedition into the Peruvian Andes, to measure some mountains. However, during his excursion an event unforeseen must have occurred and he started to question the role of cartography for the people…

To learn more about this amazing cartographic story, check out the project website at http://www.100-days.net/en/projekt/mdmd-mapping-fiction/project.

MapCarte initiative by the ICA Map Design Commission

Following on from a successful survey in 2012/13 that saw Damien Demaj and Kenneth Field publish in The Cartographic Journal to reassert design relevance in cartography (paper that won the Henry Johns prize in 2013), the ICA Commission on Map Design have announced an exciting initiative for 2014. Every day during the year, the Commission web site will publish a short daily blog post titled “MapCarte” to showcase examples of map design that represent some of the very best in classic and contemporary cartography. The intent is to build a repository of 365 maps that cover the breadth of cartographic practice to illustrate and emphasize the importance of map design. The Commission believes there is no other similar repository. The reason for such an effort is simple: how many times do we (as cartographers) get asked to point to examples of great cartography? And how many times do we struggle to come up with a list we can easily point to?

By the end of the year we will have created a compendium that can act as a reference for high quality map design that we can all share and point to. It will provide experts with a key list and hopefully show new map-makers the standards set. In some ways it’s a reaction to the mashup culture and the massive increase in poor mapping we see. We are intent on shifting the public demand for quality in maps instead of quantity and we hope that by showcasing great maps we can encourage standards in general to improve. Some of the maps you’ll have seen before – some possibly not. We’ll include both traditional print cartography and the very best that the internet has to offer. Each map will be illustrated and accompanied by a brief comment or two on why we feel the map exhibits great design.

MapCarte Initiative

Small selection of maps featured by the MapCarte initiative.

Hopefully the maps we’ll showcase will provide a barometer for modern map making, inspiration for those who seek ideas for how to map their data and also to improve the public’s appreciation of and demand for quality in maps. We also need help: Please consider emailing to the Commission Chair Kenneth Field or send him a tweet (@kennethfield) with your ideas and examples. We want this list to be inclusive so the more people who contribute ideas, the more we will generate a repository that truly represents the global cartographic community. Please also follow the series via Twitter (@ICAMapDesign) or the commission blog at mapdesign.icaci.org.

We hope you enjoy the series – a new daily cartographic treat to delight us in 2014!

Webinar on NASA World Wind and the Europa Challenge

The ICA-OSGeo Lab Network and MundoGEO are now pleased to inform the fourth webinar of the “Open Geospatial Science & Applications” webinar series on 13 February 2014. The webinars will be open and free to all on first come register basis.

This webinar will be on NASA World Wind and also on the Europa Challenge by Patrick Hogan (NASA) and Maria Antonia Brovelli (Politecnico di Milano, Italy).

Students might want to have a look at the NASA World Wind Europa Challenge. Apply now! You can see last year’s winning projects at http://eurochallenge.como.polimi.it/projects2013.

To register for the webinar please go to https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/604781066.

The schedule for the next three ICA-OSGeo Lab webinar series is below:

Feb 2014

“NASA World Wind Virtual Globe Technology” – Patrick Hogan (NASA) and Maria Antonia Brovelli (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)
Thursday, 13 February 2014, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PST

March 2014

“Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network ” – Chris Pettit (University of Melbourne, Australia)
7 March 2014 (time to be confirmed)

April 2014

“Things to do with OpenStreetMap” – Lluís Vicens (University of Girona, Spain)
Date to be confirmed

Previous webinars recording will be available at both the Geo For All website and at MundoGeo.

Cartographier les récits : enjeux méthodologiques et technologiques

The Art and Cartography Commission is organizing a colloquy (in French) entitled “Cartographier les récits : enjeux méthodologiques et technologiques” (Montréal, May 12–13, 2014). Deadline to submit an abstract (in French) for this event is January 31, 2014. The call for papers, as well as all the details are available at http://artcarto.wordpress.com/2014/01/17/appel-a-communication-cartographie-et-recits-montreal-12-13-mai-2014/

Advisory Board of the “Geo for All” initiative

We are pleased to announce the Advisory Board of the “Geo for All” initiative:

  • Professor Georg Gartner (ICA President & co-chair)
  • Jeff McKenna (OSGeo President & co-chair)
  • Professor Josef Strobl
  • Professor Marguerite Madden
  • Professor Mike Jackson
  • Sven Schade
  • Gavin Fleming
  • Sergio Acosta y Lara
  • Dr Chris Pettit
  • Professor Venkatesh Raghavan
  • Geoff Zeiss
  • Jeroen Ticheler
  • Phillip Davis
  • Arnulf Christl
  • Professor Maria Brovelli
  • Dr Rafael Moreno

The ICA-OSGeo Lab network is a joint initiative of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) and the International Cartographic Association (ICA). The ICA and OSGeo Presidents will be the co-chairs and permanent members of the Advisory Board. Others will have a 3 year term starting date of the Advisory Board being constituted (1 Dec 2013). The Advisory Board has brought together an excellent range of expertise (academia, government, industry) and geographical distribution (we have nearly all continents covered). Also it brought together members from other key communities ISPRS, AGILE, INSPIRE, UNIGIS etc which will make sure is it a fully inclusive global initiative. The Advisory Board will meet once every six months by telemeeting and AB members will keep an eye on the developments and provide strategic advice to the initiative through various forums.

While there has been tremendous growth in geospatial technology over the last few decades, the number of universities offering courses in geospatial science has not kept pace. Free and open geographic information (GI) software helps make geospatial education available to students from economically poor backgrounds worldwide (removing the need for high cost proprietary GI software). Our key aim is to make it possible for students in developing and poor countries to be also able to get geospatial education. This initiative will bring more opportunities for geospatial education worldwide. Over 50 Open Source Geospatial Labs have already been established in universities around the world as part of this initiative in just two year’s time, and we will be establishing over 100 research labs worldwide by September 2014.

We will have over 500 labs established worldwide in the next five years making us the biggest geospatial education and research network on the planet and we now have a good team of experts to guide us for the future. Welcome to all members of the Advisory Board and we are looking forward to their advice and ideas for expanding this education initiative globally!

We thank all of you for your strong support for this education initiative and it is very happy for us that our initiative has now grown rapidly from very humble beginnings and is helping to widen the benefits of geospatial education opportunities to thousands of students worldwide.

Suchith Anand

Website of Geo for All: http://www.geoforall.org/

Kira B. Shingareva (1938–2013)

Kira B. Shingareva (Photo by Henrik Hargitai)

Kira B. Shingareva (Photo by Henrik Hargitai)

We are very sad to inform you, that our colleague Kira B. Shingareva passed away on Sunday, 15 September 2013.

The following text was taken from the book “Map Worlds: A History of Women in Cartography” by Will C. van den Hoonaard (Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013, pp. 149–151):

Kira B. Shingareva, professor at Moscow State University for Geodesy and Cartography was Principal Scientist at the Planetary Cartography Laboratory and the Laboratory of Comparative Planetology at the Institute of Space Researches at the Academy of Science. She was one of the most eminent cartographers of extra-terrestrial bodies and was among the first people to succeed in mapping the “dark” (reverse) side of the Moon. She headed the Commission on Planetary Cartography of the International Association of Cartography.

Shingareva was born in 1938 in Russia. Her mother died when she was five years old. Her father was a chemical engineer. It was her father who suggested, at a critical point in her studies, that she should study mathematics in the university’s astronomical curriculum. She admitted that “she is forever grateful to him for that, loving him dearly.”

She studied in Dresden, Germany where she graduated from the Technical University in 1961 (at the age of 23), obtained a PhD in 1974, and a Dr of Science in 1992. Before then, she had gone to the University of Moscow. She wanted to become a mathematician and to study the theory of mathematics. During the exams she did not have enough points to be allowed to continue with mathematics (she just missed it by 1 point). As a consequence, she went to another university which included mathematics in the astronomical curriculum.

After having returned to Moscow from Dresden in 1962, she connected with a friend who was heading the Moon project, and he asked her to work for him at the Laboratory of Comparative Planetology at the Institute of Space Researches under the aegis of the Academy of Science. In October 1959, the Soviet Luna 3 had already succeeded in photographing the Moon’s far side. Three years after her arrival at the Institute, then at the University, she participated, in 1965, in the National Space program and mapped the Moon, Mars, Phobos, and Venus. As a 27-year-old, she was very excited to work on the project. Her main task was to select the landing sites for the moon probes. On 3 February 1966, Luna 9 was able to safely land on the Moon (the first-ever to do so) and take surface close-up images in the Oceanus Procellarum; Luna 13 was able to follow up on these images on 24 December in the same year (Williams, 2005: 2,3).

A turning point early in her career was the 1967 Congress of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) where she presented, for the first time, the nomenclature of the reverse side of the Moon. She was then only 29 years old. The Soviet presentation of Atlas Obratnoi Storony Luny, Ghast 2, 1967 (Atlas of the Far Side of the Moon, Part 2) at the Union failed on several accounts. Shingareva claimed, “the images were of bad quality and there were mistakes.” Ewen A. Whitaker (1999: 176), who was closely involved with the proceedings, noted that the map and a list of new names seemed like a fait accompli. Moreover, some 45% of the names were Russian. In any case, when the USSR delegation presented their nomenclature of the Moon, they faced opposition from the United States National Committee on Lunar Mapping and Nomenclature. It suggested that only numbers should be assigned to the 450 features on the reverse side of the Moon and that “we should be very conservative in assigning names,” and “use names of permanent renown” (Commission de la Lune, 1967: 104).

According to a participant in the tri-annual meetings of the IAU congresses in the 1960s, the controversy started a year earlier, in 1966, when Dr. A. Mikhailov of the USSR Academy of Science sent a letter to Dr. D. Menzel, President of the Lunar nomenclature Commission. Dr. Mikhailov suggested that “names of poets, painters, composers, etc. be used to identify the newly imaged craters on the Zond 3 photos” (Letter from Ewen A. Whitaker to W.C. van den Hoonaard, 28 March 2011). Later that year, the USSR published a list of 153 new names, of which some 66 were Russian, by-passing the rules of the IAU Lunar Nomenclature Committee.

When she presented her map, it became evident that the standards that applied to the near side of the Moon, could not apply to the far side. The near side showed the south pole on top of the map; the far side would show it at the bottom of the map. And where would “east” and “west” be (Whitaker, 1999: 173)? The United States scientists already had much information from their own lunar orbital photographic missions (1966–1967) involving 600,000 high-resolution images (Lunar and Planetary Institute, 2010), but the Soviets wanted her to select craters and name them. The scientists from Europe agreed with the approach taken by the Russian delegation.

After Shingareva had returned to Moscow, a United States colleague sent her a map with a small crater named “Kira” in recognition of her remarkable achievements. She always had that map on her wall. All of her grandchildren know about the Kira crater. She fondly recounts the story of a 102-year-old Russian lunar scientist, naming something after him and believing that he was dead. Soon, she received a letter from him, saying, “I’m very much alive!”  It is the International Commission of Nomenclature of the IAU that then ruled that one could now name craters after people who are over 100 years old! Shingareva was busy for 10 years at the USSR Academy of Sciences, participating in the Moon Exploration Project until 1977.

Kira B. Shingareva receiving an ICA award in 2007

Kira B. Shingareva receiving the ICA Honorary Fellowship in 2007

More than 150 publications to her name, including “Atlas of Terrestrial Planets and their Moons” and “Space Activity in Russia – Background, Current State, Perspectives” (Karachevtseva et al., 2003), she was appointed as co-chairman of ICA Planetary Cartography Working Group, 1995–1999, Chair of the ICA Planetary Cartography Commission, 1999–2003, and, according to the Proceedings of the International Cartographic Conference, “managed such projects as a series of multilingual maps of planets and their moons, glossary on planetary cartography, and specialized map-oriented DB on planetary cartography in the frames of commission activity” (Shingareva, Karachevtseva, and Cherepanova, 2007). On the initiative of the Moscow State University for Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK), several groups in Europe involving Shingareva were working on a Multilingual Planetary Map Series (Hargitai, 2004:150).

More recently, Shingareva has been trying to bring her graduate students to more earth-bound projects such as bringing her experience to bear, in 2006, on finding solutions related to the Moscow Megacity Road and Transport Complex (Sinitsyna and Shingareva, 2006).

Shingareva is well recognized. She was elected Honorary Fellow of the International Cartographic Association (ICA Newsletter, Dec. 2007: 5).

Please also read In Memoriam Kira B. Shingareva by her colleagues from the Commission on Planetary Cartography.

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