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Happy International Map Year 2015–2016!Join us for the 28th International Cartographic Conference in Washington, DC!Welcome to the website of the International Cartographic Association
Happy International Map Year 2015–2016!
Join us for ICC2017 in Washington, DC, USA. The Call for Papers is now open!
Map of the Month 4/2016: OV-Map
Welcome to the website of the International Cartographic Association

What kind of map is needed to best aid human explorers of Mars? A Call for Maps by the ICA Commission on Planetary Cartography

2035 marks the target date for the first human landing on Mars as planned by NASA. In 2015, 47 landing sites or Exploration Zones (EZ) have been proposed by the planetary science community. These should be mapped in high detail in the forthcoming years to enable proper comparison of the 47 sites and the selection of the one finalist. For this task, the ICA Commission on Planetary Cartography opened a Call for Maps.

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The project is to select one candidate landing site and design an actual map that you envision will be useful in surface operations. We ask that you do not create simply a geologic map, but rather a product that can be used by the astronauts during their approximately one-year long mission within the Exploration Zone. This requires creativity, and it is also useful to have a good knowledge of surface features, surface hazards, science goals and the use of the proper cartographic tools.

The contest is open to students, young professional cartographers, and graphic artists in any country of the world.

The display and format of the maps entirely up to the participants. All submitted maps must be accompanied by a short paper (in the English language). Deadline for the submission of maps and papers is September 1, 2016.

Please find all details about the competition on the following website:
planetcarto.wordpress.com/2016/04/22/mars-exploration-zone-map-competition

The contest is part of the International Map Year activities.

Joint ICA meeting in Vienna, November 8–9

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All chairs and vice-chairs of the ICA commissions and working groups were invited to join an ICA meeting in Vienna on 8–9 November 2015 to plan and discuss their activities for the term 2015–2019. 46 chairs, vice-chairs and members of the executive committee followed the invitation and spent two intensive workshop days at Technische Universität Wien.

Meeting participants

Commission chairs and vice-chairs

Working Group International Map Year

Executive Committee

Website

More photos of the workshop can be found on the ICA Facebook page.

Get to know the new ICA commissions for the term 2015–2019

27 commissions and 3 working groups were elected for the term 2015–2019 by the ICA General Assembly 2015. We are currently in the process of updating the website to reflect these changes. Also some of the commissions are still preparing or updating their websites. In the meantime, we invite you to have a look at the short “Commissions at a glance” presentations, which the new commissions chairs gave during ICC 2015:

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Updates on the Joint ICA Symposium on Cartography Beyond the Ordinary World

The organizers of the Joint ICA Symposium on Cartography Beyond the Ordinary World decided to extend the deadlines as follows:

  • Submission of abstracts: 10 April 2015
  • Notification of authors about acceptance: 23 April 2015
  • Submission of full papers and abstracts for posters together with the registration form: 26 May 2015
  • Arrival of registration form (for participants only) and payment: 10 June 2015

The ICA Commissions on Cartography and Children, Maps for Blind and Visually Impaired People, Planetary Cartography and Cartography for Early Warning and Crisis Management invite all of you to participate in this event. More detailed information can be found on the symposium website: niteroi2015.elte.hu

The event will be held in the Institute of Geosciences of the Fluminense Federal University in Niteroi (Brazil) during the 21st and 22nd of August, 2015 and it is organized within the International Map Year as well as the activities previous to ICC 2015 in Rio de Janeiro.

Looking forward to meeting you in Niteroi next August!

On behalf of the four participating commissions and local organizers,
Jesus Reyes

Invitation to ICC 2015 Pre-Conference Symposium at the Fluminense Federal University in Niteroi, Brazil

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The ICA Commissions on Cartography and Children, Maps for Blind and Visually Impaired People, Planetary Cartography and Cartography for Early Warning and Crisis Management have the pleasure to invite you to participate in our Joint ICA Symposium entitled “Cartography Beyond the Ordinary World”. The event will be held in the Institute of Geosciences of the Fluminense Federal University in Niteroi (Brazil) during the 21st and 22nd of August, 2015 and it is organized within the International Map Year as well as the activities previous to ICC 2015 in Rio de Janeiro.

More detailed information can be found on the symposium website: http://niteroi2015.elte.hu

All the colleagues involved in the organization of the event hope that the symposium will be an excellent occassion to exchange opinions and experiences about the common points in the work of our commissions. One of our main aims is to bring an opportunity to connect the international academic research and educational community with the Brazilian scientific potential in each of our research fields to foster a professional, constructive and innovative dialogue. It is open not only for commission members, but for all those colleagues across the wide spectrum of research, teaching and other activities covered by the world of cartography.

Looking forward to meeting you in Niteroi next August!

On behalf of the four participating commissions,
Jesus Reyes

Joint commission meeting children/planets

cccmeeting2014A day before beginning the 9th International Workshop on Digital Approaches to Cartographic Heritage, the Commission on Cartography and Children will have a meeting together with the Commission on Planetary Cartography. There will be a special presentation by former ICA President Bengt Rystedt representing the Working Group on the International Map Year.

All of you are invited to participate!

For more information, please see the Preliminary Programme.

Planetary Cartography for Children

call4papersThe ICA Commission on Planetary Cartography‘s annual meeting will be held in Budapest, on 3 September 2014, one day prior to the 9th ICA Workshop Digital Approaches to Cartographic Heritage.

The meeting will be accompanied with a one-session workshop on the topic Planetary Cartography for Children.

Read the Call for papers here!

Participation in the meeting and workshop is free.

Commissions at a glance

During ICC 2013 all commission chairs presented their commissions in a speed presentation. You can check out the presentation slides below (or via our ICC 2013 sub-page).

Kira B. Shingareva (1938–2013)

Kira B. Shingareva (Photo by Henrik Hargitai)

Kira B. Shingareva (Photo by Henrik Hargitai)

We are very sad to inform you, that our colleague Kira B. Shingareva passed away on Sunday, 15 September 2013.

The following text was taken from the book “Map Worlds: A History of Women in Cartography” by Will C. van den Hoonaard (Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013, pp. 149–151):

Kira B. Shingareva, professor at Moscow State University for Geodesy and Cartography was Principal Scientist at the Planetary Cartography Laboratory and the Laboratory of Comparative Planetology at the Institute of Space Researches at the Academy of Science. She was one of the most eminent cartographers of extra-terrestrial bodies and was among the first people to succeed in mapping the “dark” (reverse) side of the Moon. She headed the Commission on Planetary Cartography of the International Association of Cartography.

Shingareva was born in 1938 in Russia. Her mother died when she was five years old. Her father was a chemical engineer. It was her father who suggested, at a critical point in her studies, that she should study mathematics in the university’s astronomical curriculum. She admitted that “she is forever grateful to him for that, loving him dearly.”

She studied in Dresden, Germany where she graduated from the Technical University in 1961 (at the age of 23), obtained a PhD in 1974, and a Dr of Science in 1992. Before then, she had gone to the University of Moscow. She wanted to become a mathematician and to study the theory of mathematics. During the exams she did not have enough points to be allowed to continue with mathematics (she just missed it by 1 point). As a consequence, she went to another university which included mathematics in the astronomical curriculum.

After having returned to Moscow from Dresden in 1962, she connected with a friend who was heading the Moon project, and he asked her to work for him at the Laboratory of Comparative Planetology at the Institute of Space Researches under the aegis of the Academy of Science. In October 1959, the Soviet Luna 3 had already succeeded in photographing the Moon’s far side. Three years after her arrival at the Institute, then at the University, she participated, in 1965, in the National Space program and mapped the Moon, Mars, Phobos, and Venus. As a 27-year-old, she was very excited to work on the project. Her main task was to select the landing sites for the moon probes. On 3 February 1966, Luna 9 was able to safely land on the Moon (the first-ever to do so) and take surface close-up images in the Oceanus Procellarum; Luna 13 was able to follow up on these images on 24 December in the same year (Williams, 2005: 2,3).

A turning point early in her career was the 1967 Congress of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) where she presented, for the first time, the nomenclature of the reverse side of the Moon. She was then only 29 years old. The Soviet presentation of Atlas Obratnoi Storony Luny, Ghast 2, 1967 (Atlas of the Far Side of the Moon, Part 2) at the Union failed on several accounts. Shingareva claimed, “the images were of bad quality and there were mistakes.” Ewen A. Whitaker (1999: 176), who was closely involved with the proceedings, noted that the map and a list of new names seemed like a fait accompli. Moreover, some 45% of the names were Russian. In any case, when the USSR delegation presented their nomenclature of the Moon, they faced opposition from the United States National Committee on Lunar Mapping and Nomenclature. It suggested that only numbers should be assigned to the 450 features on the reverse side of the Moon and that “we should be very conservative in assigning names,” and “use names of permanent renown” (Commission de la Lune, 1967: 104).

According to a participant in the tri-annual meetings of the IAU congresses in the 1960s, the controversy started a year earlier, in 1966, when Dr. A. Mikhailov of the USSR Academy of Science sent a letter to Dr. D. Menzel, President of the Lunar nomenclature Commission. Dr. Mikhailov suggested that “names of poets, painters, composers, etc. be used to identify the newly imaged craters on the Zond 3 photos” (Letter from Ewen A. Whitaker to W.C. van den Hoonaard, 28 March 2011). Later that year, the USSR published a list of 153 new names, of which some 66 were Russian, by-passing the rules of the IAU Lunar Nomenclature Committee.

When she presented her map, it became evident that the standards that applied to the near side of the Moon, could not apply to the far side. The near side showed the south pole on top of the map; the far side would show it at the bottom of the map. And where would “east” and “west” be (Whitaker, 1999: 173)? The United States scientists already had much information from their own lunar orbital photographic missions (1966–1967) involving 600,000 high-resolution images (Lunar and Planetary Institute, 2010), but the Soviets wanted her to select craters and name them. The scientists from Europe agreed with the approach taken by the Russian delegation.

After Shingareva had returned to Moscow, a United States colleague sent her a map with a small crater named “Kira” in recognition of her remarkable achievements. She always had that map on her wall. All of her grandchildren know about the Kira crater. She fondly recounts the story of a 102-year-old Russian lunar scientist, naming something after him and believing that he was dead. Soon, she received a letter from him, saying, “I’m very much alive!”  It is the International Commission of Nomenclature of the IAU that then ruled that one could now name craters after people who are over 100 years old! Shingareva was busy for 10 years at the USSR Academy of Sciences, participating in the Moon Exploration Project until 1977.

Kira B. Shingareva receiving an ICA award in 2007

Kira B. Shingareva receiving the ICA Honorary Fellowship in 2007

More than 150 publications to her name, including “Atlas of Terrestrial Planets and their Moons” and “Space Activity in Russia – Background, Current State, Perspectives” (Karachevtseva et al., 2003), she was appointed as co-chairman of ICA Planetary Cartography Working Group, 1995–1999, Chair of the ICA Planetary Cartography Commission, 1999–2003, and, according to the Proceedings of the International Cartographic Conference, “managed such projects as a series of multilingual maps of planets and their moons, glossary on planetary cartography, and specialized map-oriented DB on planetary cartography in the frames of commission activity” (Shingareva, Karachevtseva, and Cherepanova, 2007). On the initiative of the Moscow State University for Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK), several groups in Europe involving Shingareva were working on a Multilingual Planetary Map Series (Hargitai, 2004:150).

More recently, Shingareva has been trying to bring her graduate students to more earth-bound projects such as bringing her experience to bear, in 2006, on finding solutions related to the Moscow Megacity Road and Transport Complex (Sinitsyna and Shingareva, 2006).

Shingareva is well recognized. She was elected Honorary Fellow of the International Cartographic Association (ICA Newsletter, Dec. 2007: 5).

Please also read In Memoriam Kira B. Shingareva by her colleagues from the Commission on Planetary Cartography.

Programme of joint symposium “Sharing Knowledge”

Pre-Conference Symposium to ICC2013
23 August 2013 @ the Dresden University of Technology, Germany

The ICA Commissions on Cartography and Children, Education and Training, Maps and Graphics for Blind and Partially Sighted People and Planetary Cartography have the pleasure to invite you to a one day joint symposium on August 23.

The aim of the symposium – as expressed by the title – is to give an opportunity to the members of the four commissions (and participants in general) to share and learn about the research in the topics covered by the commissions during the last years. This will be a one-day programme divided into four sessions, each of them dedicated to one of the participating commissions.

Please find the final programme on the symposium website: http://lazarus.elte.hu/jointsymposium2013/

If you have any question in relation to the event, please contact José Jesús Reyes Nunez.

[ More pre-conference events and activities can be found at http://icaci.org/icc2013/ ]

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