Welcome to the International Cartographic Association
Welcome to the website of the International Cartographic AssociationJune’s Map of the Month: World atlas in Polish and Braille
Welcome to the website of the International Cartographic Association
June’s Map of the Month is a world atlas in Polish and Braille
Map of the Month 05/2014: Physical Geography of Ukraine
Map of the Month 04/2014: Back in time feature on Géoportail

ICA-OSGeo awarded for support provided for the NASA World Wind Europa Challenge

The ICA-OSGeo Lab Network was awarded for the support provided for the NASA World Wind Europa Challenge.

The first edition of NASA World Wind Europa Challenge achieved its objective of inspiring ideas for building great applications that serve the INSPIRE Directive and uses NASA’s open source virtual globe technology World Wind.

 

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Kira B. Shingareva (1938–2013)

Kira B. Shingareva (Photo by Henrik Hargitai)

Kira B. Shingareva (Photo by Henrik Hargitai)

We are very sad to inform you, that our colleague Kira B. Shingareva passed away on Sunday, 15 September 2013.

The following text was taken from the book “Map Worlds: A History of Women in Cartography” by Will C. van den Hoonaard (Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013, pp. 149–151):

Kira B. Shingareva, professor at Moscow State University for Geodesy and Cartography was Principal Scientist at the Planetary Cartography Laboratory and the Laboratory of Comparative Planetology at the Institute of Space Researches at the Academy of Science. She was one of the most eminent cartographers of extra-terrestrial bodies and was among the first people to succeed in mapping the “dark” (reverse) side of the Moon. She headed the Commission on Planetary Cartography of the International Association of Cartography.

Shingareva was born in 1938 in Russia. Her mother died when she was five years old. Her father was a chemical engineer. It was her father who suggested, at a critical point in her studies, that she should study mathematics in the university’s astronomical curriculum. She admitted that “she is forever grateful to him for that, loving him dearly.”

She studied in Dresden, Germany where she graduated from the Technical University in 1961 (at the age of 23), obtained a PhD in 1974, and a Dr of Science in 1992. Before then, she had gone to the University of Moscow. She wanted to become a mathematician and to study the theory of mathematics. During the exams she did not have enough points to be allowed to continue with mathematics (she just missed it by 1 point). As a consequence, she went to another university which included mathematics in the astronomical curriculum.

After having returned to Moscow from Dresden in 1962, she connected with a friend who was heading the Moon project, and he asked her to work for him at the Laboratory of Comparative Planetology at the Institute of Space Researches under the aegis of the Academy of Science. In October 1959, the Soviet Luna 3 had already succeeded in photographing the Moon’s far side. Three years after her arrival at the Institute, then at the University, she participated, in 1965, in the National Space program and mapped the Moon, Mars, Phobos, and Venus. As a 27-year-old, she was very excited to work on the project. Her main task was to select the landing sites for the moon probes. On 3 February 1966, Luna 9 was able to safely land on the Moon (the first-ever to do so) and take surface close-up images in the Oceanus Procellarum; Luna 13 was able to follow up on these images on 24 December in the same year (Williams, 2005: 2,3).

A turning point early in her career was the 1967 Congress of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) where she presented, for the first time, the nomenclature of the reverse side of the Moon. She was then only 29 years old. The Soviet presentation of Atlas Obratnoi Storony Luny, Ghast 2, 1967 (Atlas of the Far Side of the Moon, Part 2) at the Union failed on several accounts. Shingareva claimed, “the images were of bad quality and there were mistakes.” Ewen A. Whitaker (1999: 176), who was closely involved with the proceedings, noted that the map and a list of new names seemed like a fait accompli. Moreover, some 45% of the names were Russian. In any case, when the USSR delegation presented their nomenclature of the Moon, they faced opposition from the United States National Committee on Lunar Mapping and Nomenclature. It suggested that only numbers should be assigned to the 450 features on the reverse side of the Moon and that “we should be very conservative in assigning names,” and “use names of permanent renown” (Commission de la Lune, 1967: 104).

According to a participant in the tri-annual meetings of the IAU congresses in the 1960s, the controversy started a year earlier, in 1966, when Dr. A. Mikhailov of the USSR Academy of Science sent a letter to Dr. D. Menzel, President of the Lunar nomenclature Commission. Dr. Mikhailov suggested that “names of poets, painters, composers, etc. be used to identify the newly imaged craters on the Zond 3 photos” (Letter from Ewen A. Whitaker to W.C. van den Hoonaard, 28 March 2011). Later that year, the USSR published a list of 153 new names, of which some 66 were Russian, by-passing the rules of the IAU Lunar Nomenclature Committee.

When she presented her map, it became evident that the standards that applied to the near side of the Moon, could not apply to the far side. The near side showed the south pole on top of the map; the far side would show it at the bottom of the map. And where would “east” and “west” be (Whitaker, 1999: 173)? The United States scientists already had much information from their own lunar orbital photographic missions (1966–1967) involving 600,000 high-resolution images (Lunar and Planetary Institute, 2010), but the Soviets wanted her to select craters and name them. The scientists from Europe agreed with the approach taken by the Russian delegation.

After Shingareva had returned to Moscow, a United States colleague sent her a map with a small crater named “Kira” in recognition of her remarkable achievements. She always had that map on her wall. All of her grandchildren know about the Kira crater. She fondly recounts the story of a 102-year-old Russian lunar scientist, naming something after him and believing that he was dead. Soon, she received a letter from him, saying, “I’m very much alive!”  It is the International Commission of Nomenclature of the IAU that then ruled that one could now name craters after people who are over 100 years old! Shingareva was busy for 10 years at the USSR Academy of Sciences, participating in the Moon Exploration Project until 1977.

Kira B. Shingareva receiving an ICA award in 2007

Kira B. Shingareva receiving the ICA Honorary Fellowship in 2007

More than 150 publications to her name, including “Atlas of Terrestrial Planets and their Moons” and “Space Activity in Russia – Background, Current State, Perspectives” (Karachevtseva et al., 2003), she was appointed as co-chairman of ICA Planetary Cartography Working Group, 1995–1999, Chair of the ICA Planetary Cartography Commission, 1999–2003, and, according to the Proceedings of the International Cartographic Conference, “managed such projects as a series of multilingual maps of planets and their moons, glossary on planetary cartography, and specialized map-oriented DB on planetary cartography in the frames of commission activity” (Shingareva, Karachevtseva, and Cherepanova, 2007). On the initiative of the Moscow State University for Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK), several groups in Europe involving Shingareva were working on a Multilingual Planetary Map Series (Hargitai, 2004:150).

More recently, Shingareva has been trying to bring her graduate students to more earth-bound projects such as bringing her experience to bear, in 2006, on finding solutions related to the Moscow Megacity Road and Transport Complex (Sinitsyna and Shingareva, 2006).

Shingareva is well recognized. She was elected Honorary Fellow of the International Cartographic Association (ICA Newsletter, Dec. 2007: 5).

Please also read In Memoriam Kira B. Shingareva by her colleagues from the Commission on Planetary Cartography.

First Australian Open Source Geospatial Laboratory to Support Smarter Cities will be built at the University of Melbourne

The University of Melbourne will be home to Australia’s first Open Source Geospatial Laboratory. The laboratory will support urban research and educational excellence through the use of location based (geospatial) data and tools.

The Laboratory will undertake research and provide training resources which utilises digital data and analytical and visualisation tools to up-skill a myriad of disciplines in evidenced based decision-making practices. Training will be delivered both into existing University curriculum and through a series of workshops and short-courses.

The laboratory is expected to attract considerable interest from urban geographers, spatial scientists, planners and policy-makers who are keen to contribute to and learn about the latest available data driven techniques to support evidenced based decision-making. The laboratory will utilise the Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN). AURIN is a $20 million open source e-infrastructure initiative which is unlocking datasets of relevance to Australia’s cities and providing an analytical toolkit to inform sustainable urban futures.

The software used to support activities of the laboratory is open source, meaning the source code can be modified and re-distributed royalty and fee free. This open source geospatial laboratory is a joint initiative of the International Cartographic Association (ICA) and the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The laboratory will see scientists and practitioners from the International Cartographic Association (ICA) and the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) collaborate closely with University colleagues. This Australian facility will be part of a global network of open geospatial research labs known as ICA-OSGeo labs. Currently there are 22 ICA-OSGeo labs operating globally.

Dr Christopher Pettit, Associate Professor at the University of Melbourne, Victorian Chair of the Surveying and Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI) and Strategic Implementation Coordinator of AURIN will lead the initiative.

“The University of Melbourne is one of the top research universities in the world and has been a pioneer in Australian geospatial science research,” said Professor Tom Kvan, Dean of the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning. “We are delighted to collaborate with the ICA and OSGeo to create this opportunity for our students and researchers, which will encourage open geospatial teaching and related research in other universities.”

The facility will open in September 2013.

Further Information

Dr Christopher Pettit
The University of Melbourne
Email: cpettit@unimelb.edu.au
Phone: +61 422 301 832

Dr Suchith Anand
University of Nottingham
Phone: +44 (0)115 84 32750
Email: suchith.anand@nottingham.ac.uk

OSGeo is a not-for-profit organisation founded in 2006 whose mission is to support and promote the collaborative development of open source geospatial technologies and data.

ICA is the world authoritative body for cartography, the discipline dealing with the conception, production, dissemination and study of maps.

Finalist entries to the Barbara Petchenik Competition 2013

Peter and René van der Krogt photographing the finalist entries

Peter van der Krogt and his brother René photographing the finalist entries.

Entries to the Barbara Petchenik Competition 2013, which were selected for the international level of the competition, can now be accessed here: http://www.explokart.eu/petchenik/ Many thanks to Peter and René van der Krogt for digitizing 155 submissions from 30 countries!

The finalist entries will be on display at the ICC in Dresden, where the winners of the international competition will be selected.

The ICA congratulates all winners on the national level!

Update:

 

Programme of joint symposium “Sharing Knowledge”

Pre-Conference Symposium to ICC2013
23 August 2013 @ the Dresden University of Technology, Germany

The ICA Commissions on Cartography and Children, Education and Training, Maps and Graphics for Blind and Partially Sighted People and Planetary Cartography have the pleasure to invite you to a one day joint symposium on August 23.

The aim of the symposium – as expressed by the title – is to give an opportunity to the members of the four commissions (and participants in general) to share and learn about the research in the topics covered by the commissions during the last years. This will be a one-day programme divided into four sessions, each of them dedicated to one of the participating commissions.

Please find the final programme on the symposium website: http://lazarus.elte.hu/jointsymposium2013/

If you have any question in relation to the event, please contact José Jesús Reyes Nunez.

[ More pre-conference events and activities can be found at http://icaci.org/icc2013/ ]

Invitation to ICC Workshop “Mapping in a Digital World”

Pre-Conference Workshop to ICC2013
24 August 2013 in Dresden, Germany

Organized by the ICA Commissions on Map Design and Neocartography, this one-day workshop will explore practical themes relating to the design of effective online maps and information products; focusing on realtime, interactivity and design not only of the map but of the user interface and experience to support cartography.

Morning presentations by a range of acknowledged experts in the field will seek to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art as well as touch on some of the challenges we face. Participants are encouraged to contribute to the workshop in two ways; either through offering a 15 minute paper on their own work in this area; or through a lightning talk. We may also do some lightning talks on the day so please come prepared to contribute to the workshop! Finally, we will share ideas and seek to develop common threads to take work in this area forward as part of a panel discussion.

Call for papers

Short papers: We invite short papers (15 mins with 5mins for questions) on aspects of design as it relates to web mapping for inclusion.  Specifically of interest are conceptual and practical contributions exploring the design of maps in web and mobile environments, aesthetics, geovisualization, art in (and of) cartography and assessments of new and innovative methods.  We are particularly interested in the challenges facing cartography in web and mobile environments and how it responds by re-imagining traditional practice in new technological paradigms.

Lightning talks: We also invite 5 minute lightning talks that share an idea, open a debate or deal with a very specific issue. These aren’t the place for long expositions and discussions of detailed research…simple ideas, eloquently expressed and fast!

To submit a paper or lighting talk idea please email Kenneth Field no later than 30th June 2013.

Confirmed speakers for the morning sessions

  • Kenneth Field (Esri)
  • Steve Chilton (Middlesex University)
  • Gary Gale (Nokia)
  • Andrew Turner (GeoIQ & Esri)
  • Damien Demaj (Esri)
  • Alexander Kent (University of Canterbury)
  • Bernhard Jenny (Oregon State University)
  • more to be announced…

ICC2013 participants may register for the workshop (which is FREE to attend) at http://www.icc2013.org/?node=46

Details on the workshop will also appear on the websites of the ICA Commission on Map Design and the
ICA Commission on Neocartography.

Workshop on historical maps, atlases and toponymy, Leipzig, Germany, August 2013

As a pre-conference event of the 26th International Cartographic Conference which will take place in Dresden, 25–30 August 2013, three ICA commissions/working groups (on Atlases, on the History of Cartography, on Toponymy) have organized a workshop on historical maps, atlases and toponymy at the Leibniz Institute of Regional Geography [Leibniz Institut für Länderkunde], Schongauer Straße 9, Leipzig, Germany, 22–23 August 2013. This workshop is conceived as a sequence of paper presentations with a focus on the function and use of place names on historical maps and in all kinds of atlases (ranging from scientific to school atlases and from macro-regional and national atlases to city atlases). All papers will be presented in the plenary with members of all three commissions/working groups present.

You need not be a member, corresponding member or associated expert of one of our WG/commissions to take part. Every person interested is very welcome. No registration fee is requested. So far we have 20 papers in the programme, among them presentations by Christopher Board, Ferjan Ormeling and Ernst Spiess.

The workshop is conveniently scheduled for Thursday and Friday before ICC Dresden starts on Sunday and will last from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday and 9 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. on Friday with a social dinner on Thursday evening and the offer of guided tours in small groups to the famous geographical and cartographic library of the hosting institute at various times.

For detailed information please contact
Peter Jordan, Chair of the Commission on Atlases
Elri Liebenberg, Chair of the Commission on the History of Cartography
Paulo de Menezes, Chair of the Working Group and IGU Commission on Toponymy

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