Welcome to the International Cartographic Association
Welcome to the website of the International Cartographic AssociationJune’s Map of the Month: World atlas in Polish and Braille
Welcome to the website of the International Cartographic Association
Map of the Month 07/2014: Death in Grand Canyon
June’s Map of the Month is a world atlas in Polish and Braille
Map of the Month 05/2014: Physical Geography of Ukraine

October’s Map of the Month is the Chang’E-1 Topographic Atlas of the Moon

Chang’E-1 Topographic Atlas of the Moon

Our Map of the Month series is back with a Chinese atlas for October: “Chang’E-1 Topographic Atlas of the Moon” published by the National Astronomical Observatories at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. It received the third jury prize in the category “Atlases” at the International Cartographic Exhibition at ICC 2013 in Dresden.

Zoom in and find more details here!

Category: General News

eCARTO News September 2013

eCARTO News capture the latest cartographic news and developments from around the world. If you have any general cartography items of interest then please email them to the editor of eCARTO News.

General News

Applications

  • Mesmerising map of the London Underground plots journeys in ‘real-time’ – london24.com
  • Maps of Languages in America – slate.com
  • New project to develop satellite mapping of growing crops – farmersguardian.com
  • GIS for Real Estate” blends mapping, real estate analysis – utdmercury.com
  • Google Maps Mobile Users Can Now Get Waze Traffic Reports – eweek.com
  • This Amazing New Map Charts ‘Moments,’ Rather Than Places – theatlanticcities.com

Industry News

  • Google Maps Camera-toting teams map Fla. beaches – dailyamerican.com
  • What’s Apple’s Mapping Shopping Spree Really About? – streetfightmag.com
  • Winfield Launches New Mapping Capabilities For R7 Tool – croplife.com
  • Forget tablets. Nokia has a bigger connected gadget in mind: the car – gigaom.com
  • CityMaps Launches Official iOS App That Aims To Make Mapping Social – techcrunch.com
  • How the Financial Times has upped its mapping game – journalism.co.uk

Archaeological and Cultural Mapping

3D Mapping

  • 3-D mapping in real time, without the drift – web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2013
  • Developers take mapping indoors – globalnews.ca
  • How 3D maps can get more accurate – gcn.com
  • Barbican gets creative with 3D video projection mapping – conference-news.co.uk
  • 3D-mapping fixes woman’s heart – iol.co.za
  • Attitude Enterprises to present 3D Interactive Kinetic Mapping System – ameinfo.com
  • Tech tidbits: Artificial intelligence for electric car and 3D mapping – livemint.com
  • Norway says no way to Apple’s 3D mapping – venturebeat.com
  • 3D imaging firm captures $3.5 mil’ airborne mapping contract – sparpointgroup.com
  • 3D Laser Mapping Launches New Mobile Mapping Data Logger – amerisurv.com
  • Patent Application Titled “Three-Dimensional Mapping Using Scanning Electron Microscope Images” Published Online – hispanicbusiness.com

Education and Resources

Political and Social Cartography

  • Mapping unemployment in Oregon, county by county – oregonlive.com
  • Mapping Politics – psmag.com
  • Mapping Ithaca: Minorities Tend to Live on City’s Periphery – cornellsun.com
  • Huawei wishes Pakistan happy independence with map that gets its borders wrong – qz.com
  • Interactive Map Color-Codes Race of Every Single American – newswatch.nationalgeographic.com
  • Breaking the silence: how online mapping is tackling gender-based violence – theguardian.com

Planetary Cartography

Opinion

Environmental Mapping

CrowdSourcing and Social Media

  • USGS Needs YOU! Help Our National Mapping Efforts By Adding Your Community’s Landmarks and Buildings – directionsmag.com
  • Google Maps rival OpenStreetMap makes slick ‘iD’ editor its default map making tool – thenextweb.com
  • Uncharted territory: amateur cartographers fight to put their communities on the map – wired.co.uk
  • Crowd-mapping With Cell Phones – spectrum.ieee.org
  • “Crowd-Sourced Vision and Sensor-Surveyed Mapping” in Patent Application Approval Process – hispanicbusiness.com

Tourist Mapping

Art in Cartography

Cartography Lite

 

Kira B. Shingareva (1938–2013)

Kira B. Shingareva (Photo by Henrik Hargitai)

Kira B. Shingareva (Photo by Henrik Hargitai)

We are very sad to inform you, that our colleague Kira B. Shingareva passed away on Sunday, 15 September 2013.

The following text was taken from the book “Map Worlds: A History of Women in Cartography” by Will C. van den Hoonaard (Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013, pp. 149–151):

Kira B. Shingareva, professor at Moscow State University for Geodesy and Cartography was Principal Scientist at the Planetary Cartography Laboratory and the Laboratory of Comparative Planetology at the Institute of Space Researches at the Academy of Science. She was one of the most eminent cartographers of extra-terrestrial bodies and was among the first people to succeed in mapping the “dark” (reverse) side of the Moon. She headed the Commission on Planetary Cartography of the International Association of Cartography.

Shingareva was born in 1938 in Russia. Her mother died when she was five years old. Her father was a chemical engineer. It was her father who suggested, at a critical point in her studies, that she should study mathematics in the university’s astronomical curriculum. She admitted that “she is forever grateful to him for that, loving him dearly.”

She studied in Dresden, Germany where she graduated from the Technical University in 1961 (at the age of 23), obtained a PhD in 1974, and a Dr of Science in 1992. Before then, she had gone to the University of Moscow. She wanted to become a mathematician and to study the theory of mathematics. During the exams she did not have enough points to be allowed to continue with mathematics (she just missed it by 1 point). As a consequence, she went to another university which included mathematics in the astronomical curriculum.

After having returned to Moscow from Dresden in 1962, she connected with a friend who was heading the Moon project, and he asked her to work for him at the Laboratory of Comparative Planetology at the Institute of Space Researches under the aegis of the Academy of Science. In October 1959, the Soviet Luna 3 had already succeeded in photographing the Moon’s far side. Three years after her arrival at the Institute, then at the University, she participated, in 1965, in the National Space program and mapped the Moon, Mars, Phobos, and Venus. As a 27-year-old, she was very excited to work on the project. Her main task was to select the landing sites for the moon probes. On 3 February 1966, Luna 9 was able to safely land on the Moon (the first-ever to do so) and take surface close-up images in the Oceanus Procellarum; Luna 13 was able to follow up on these images on 24 December in the same year (Williams, 2005: 2,3).

A turning point early in her career was the 1967 Congress of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) where she presented, for the first time, the nomenclature of the reverse side of the Moon. She was then only 29 years old. The Soviet presentation of Atlas Obratnoi Storony Luny, Ghast 2, 1967 (Atlas of the Far Side of the Moon, Part 2) at the Union failed on several accounts. Shingareva claimed, “the images were of bad quality and there were mistakes.” Ewen A. Whitaker (1999: 176), who was closely involved with the proceedings, noted that the map and a list of new names seemed like a fait accompli. Moreover, some 45% of the names were Russian. In any case, when the USSR delegation presented their nomenclature of the Moon, they faced opposition from the United States National Committee on Lunar Mapping and Nomenclature. It suggested that only numbers should be assigned to the 450 features on the reverse side of the Moon and that “we should be very conservative in assigning names,” and “use names of permanent renown” (Commission de la Lune, 1967: 104).

According to a participant in the tri-annual meetings of the IAU congresses in the 1960s, the controversy started a year earlier, in 1966, when Dr. A. Mikhailov of the USSR Academy of Science sent a letter to Dr. D. Menzel, President of the Lunar nomenclature Commission. Dr. Mikhailov suggested that “names of poets, painters, composers, etc. be used to identify the newly imaged craters on the Zond 3 photos” (Letter from Ewen A. Whitaker to W.C. van den Hoonaard, 28 March 2011). Later that year, the USSR published a list of 153 new names, of which some 66 were Russian, by-passing the rules of the IAU Lunar Nomenclature Committee.

When she presented her map, it became evident that the standards that applied to the near side of the Moon, could not apply to the far side. The near side showed the south pole on top of the map; the far side would show it at the bottom of the map. And where would “east” and “west” be (Whitaker, 1999: 173)? The United States scientists already had much information from their own lunar orbital photographic missions (1966–1967) involving 600,000 high-resolution images (Lunar and Planetary Institute, 2010), but the Soviets wanted her to select craters and name them. The scientists from Europe agreed with the approach taken by the Russian delegation.

After Shingareva had returned to Moscow, a United States colleague sent her a map with a small crater named “Kira” in recognition of her remarkable achievements. She always had that map on her wall. All of her grandchildren know about the Kira crater. She fondly recounts the story of a 102-year-old Russian lunar scientist, naming something after him and believing that he was dead. Soon, she received a letter from him, saying, “I’m very much alive!”  It is the International Commission of Nomenclature of the IAU that then ruled that one could now name craters after people who are over 100 years old! Shingareva was busy for 10 years at the USSR Academy of Sciences, participating in the Moon Exploration Project until 1977.

Kira B. Shingareva receiving an ICA award in 2007

Kira B. Shingareva receiving the ICA Honorary Fellowship in 2007

More than 150 publications to her name, including “Atlas of Terrestrial Planets and their Moons” and “Space Activity in Russia – Background, Current State, Perspectives” (Karachevtseva et al., 2003), she was appointed as co-chairman of ICA Planetary Cartography Working Group, 1995–1999, Chair of the ICA Planetary Cartography Commission, 1999–2003, and, according to the Proceedings of the International Cartographic Conference, “managed such projects as a series of multilingual maps of planets and their moons, glossary on planetary cartography, and specialized map-oriented DB on planetary cartography in the frames of commission activity” (Shingareva, Karachevtseva, and Cherepanova, 2007). On the initiative of the Moscow State University for Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK), several groups in Europe involving Shingareva were working on a Multilingual Planetary Map Series (Hargitai, 2004:150).

More recently, Shingareva has been trying to bring her graduate students to more earth-bound projects such as bringing her experience to bear, in 2006, on finding solutions related to the Moscow Megacity Road and Transport Complex (Sinitsyna and Shingareva, 2006).

Shingareva is well recognized. She was elected Honorary Fellow of the International Cartographic Association (ICA Newsletter, Dec. 2007: 5).

Please also read In Memoriam Kira B. Shingareva by her colleagues from the Commission on Planetary Cartography.

Fraser Taylor is awarded the Carl Mannerfelt Gold Medal

Fraser Taylor

Fraser Taylor during his acceptance speech at ICC 2013

Fraser Taylor and Georg Gartner

Fraser Taylor and Georg Gartner

At the ICC 2013 in Dresden, the Carl Mannerfelt gold medal was awarded to Fraser Tayor. Read the laudation by Bill Cartwright, Immediate Past-President of ICA, below:

I first met Professor Taylor when he was President of the International Cartographic Association (ICA), at one of the early International Cartographic Conferences that I attended. I was involved in research in the application of interactive multimedia to cartography and the visualization of geography, an area that Professor Taylor championed in the international cartographic and geographic communities. His enthusiasm about contributing to international scientific communities was, and is, infectious and his encouragement to participate in research and development was extremely supportive to young and experienced scientists alike. This introduction to scholarly work in cartography and geography set me on a path of participation and collaboration with the International Cartographic Association and with international cartographic and geographical communities, a path that I continue to follow today.

Professor Taylor is Distinguished Research Professor of Geography and Environmental Science, and in International Affairs and Director of the Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre, Carleton University, Canada. He has the immediate past Chair of the International Steering Committee for Global Mapping (ISCGM), an international project by world national mapping agencies of the to produce a 1:1 million digital map of the world to support environmental and sustainable development decision-making, for the past decade. This work supports international collaboration and decision-making by ensuring that appropriate, current and timely geospatial information is available.

In 2008 Professor Taylor was elected Fellow to the Social Sciences Division of the Academy of Social Sciences of the Royal Society of Canada. In 2009 he was appointed to the United Nations Expert Group on Geospatial Information Management and to the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Global Advisory Council. Also in 2009, he was elected Chair, Technical Committee III, Geospatial Data Collection, Management and Dissemination, Ninth United Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for the Americas. In 2010 he was presented with the Distinguished Service Award by the Canadian Association of African Studies.

He has contributed to regional cartographic and geographical activities, particularly the application of geomatics to socioeconomic development in a national and international context with special reference to the Canadian North, Africa, Latin America, China and Antarctica. He has also advanced regional and rural development theory and practice with special emphasis on sustainable development and indigenous development strategies in Africa and Latin America. In 2006 he was nominated by the Permanent Committee on GIS Infrastructure for Asia and the Pacific and accepted by the UN Conference Secretariat, for the position of Vice Chairman, Technical Committee 3 of the United Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Asia and the Pacific. He was also Head of the Canadian Delegation at this conference. As well, he has been active in Africa – as a member, International Cartographic Association Working Group on Mapping Africa for Africans and Antarctica – in 2000 he was appointed a member of the International Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR) Working Group for Geodesy and Geographic Information, now entitled SCAR Group of Experts on Geospatial Information.

In the International Cartographic Association he was elected Vice-President in 1984, and then President in 1987. He was again elected President for a further 4-year term of office in 1991. In August 1999, to recognise his outstanding contributions to the Association, Professor Taylor was elected an Honorary Fellow of the International Cartographic Association. As well, Professor Taylor represented the ICA on Joint Boards. In 1989 he was elected President of the International Union for Surveys and Mapping and in 2004 he was appointed a member of the Joint Board of the Geospatial Information Societies (JBGIS).

In Canada Professor Taylor is an esteemed contributor to cartographic and geographical societies. In 1978, and again in 1979 he was elected President of the Canadian Cartographic Association. In 1999 he was appointed Co-Chair of the National Atlas Advisory Committee by Natural Resources Canada. And, in 2006 he received the Award of Distinction for exceptional scholarly contributions to cartography by the Canadian Cartographic Association. He has been active in many areas of research in Canada, receiving funding for a “Living” Cybercartographic Atlas of Indigenous Artifacts and Knowledge from The Inukshuk Fund in 2007 and a Research Initiative Grant from the SSHRC in 2002 for the Cybercartography and the New Economy project. In 2012 he was awarded the Royal Canadian Geographic Society and 3M Canada Canadian Award for Environmental Innovation.

As well as these activities, Professor Taylor has undertaken research and development and published in areas where his expertise is internationally recognised, namely:

  • The theory and practice of cybercartography;
  • Electronic atlases, interactive cartographic systems and visualization;
  • The preservation and archiving of geospatial data;
  • Mapping for the blind and visually impaired; and
  • Canada’s international policies towards developing nations.

He has published extensively and presented in many fora on these topics. As well, he was appointed member of Advisory Board for Volume Six of the History of Cartography Series, University of Chicago Press, as Series Editor of the book Series entitled Modern Cartography published by Elsevier Science and Editor, Progress in Contemporary Cartography Series, Wiley & Sons. He has also edited and co-edited two editions of publications related to Cybercartography Theory and Practice.

Professor Taylor has made significant contributions and undertaken leadership roles in cartography and geography, both internationally and in Canada. Professor Taylor works tirelessly in research, teaching, publishing and outreach programmes. He is respected globally for his rigorous research, quality publications and enthusiastic approach to furthering scientific knowledge related to cartography and geography.

The Carl Mannerelt Medal Recognises excellence in scholarship and research in Cartography and GI Science. It is awarded Ob Merita Egregia (acquired) by extraordinary merits. The award of the Carl Mannerfelt Medal formally acknowledges Professor Taylor’s achievements, his effort in the international cartographic research and professional communities and his contributions to humanity.

Category: General News

ICA and EuroSDR signed a Memorandum of Understanding

Thorben Brigsted Hansen, EuroSDR President and Georg Gartner, President of ICA signing the Memorandum of Understanding between the two organizations

Thorben Brigsted Hansen, EuroSDR President, and Georg Gartner, President of ICA, signing the Memorandum of Understanding between the two organizations

At the ICC 2013 in Dresden, Germany, a Memorandum of Understanding between ICA and EuroSDR (the European spatial data research platform for National Mapping and Cadastre Agencies) was signed by EuroSDR President Thorben Brigsted Hansen and ICA President Georg Gartner.

With this the already exisiting several cooperations between ICA and EuroSDR get a renewed and stronger framework.

The full text of the signed document can be found here.

An overview over all organizations, which signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the ICA can be found here.

Category: General News

The Value of Geo-Information for Disaster and Risk Management (VALID)

On 3 September 2013, UNOOSA/UN-SPIDER presented a new report which shows the economic, humanitarian and organizational benefits of applying geoinformation to disaster management.

The report “The Value of Geo-Information for Disaster and Risk Management (VALID): Benefit Analysis and Stakeholder Assessment” is a joint publication of UNOOSA/UN-SPIDER and the Joint Board of Geoinformation Societies (JBGIS), including the International Cartographic Association (ICA). The publication aims to raise awareness and to help set priorities in research and development.

The VALID report is a follow-up publication to the Joint Board of Geospatial Information Societies (JBGIS) and UNOOSA/UN-SPIDER published ‘Geoinformation for Disaster and Risk Management – Examples and Best Practices’, a compilation of case studies that provides information on what can be done with geoinformation in support of disaster and risk management – methods, systems, applications, experiences. It analyses cases and offers an expert stakeholder assessment.

The publication (10 MB) can be downloaded from here: http://www.un-spider.org/sites/default/files/VALIDPublication.pdf

Category: General News

Honorary Fellowship for Kirsi Virrantaus

Georg Gartner, Kirsi Virrantaus

Georg Gartner, Kirsi Virrantaus

Kirsi Virrantaus

Kirsi Virrantaus during her acceptance speech

The award

The award

During ICC 2013 Kirsi Virrantaus received the ICA Honorary Fellowship. Below you can read Menno-Jan Kraak‘s laudatio:

Dear Kirsi,

It is a great pleasure to stand here, and address you before I hand you one of the ICA awards. This award of ICA honours cartographers of outstanding international reputation who have made special contribution to the ICA.

So before I can hand this awards I have to convince the audience that you indeed qualify. Two keywords in the description of the award pop up clearly. International reputation & special contribution to ICA.

The last one is easy to verify because the ICA archives hold lot of proof. First of all you served two terms as vice-president. Starting in 1999 in Ottawa, Canada with a renewal to your term in Durban, South Africa and the obligatory end in Moscow, Russia in 2007. During those eight year is the Executive Committee started a tradition to have their meetings such that it coincided with Kirsi’s birthday, because during the first time it happened she took care of drinking logistics serving Finish vodka which was much appreciated. Today both EC meetings and birthdays are no longer that fun.

Well, one can wonder if just sitting there as vice president is good enough to qualify. That would be easy. But during your term you have also been active in two commissions: “Map and Spatial Data Use” and “Gender and Cartography”. And during your second term you also acted as working group chair of the working group on “Uncertainty of spatial data and quality of maps”. You have also hosted some pre-conference ICA events in 2007 in Espoo after which you organized a train trip from Helsinki to the main conference in Moscow. If this would not be enough you have also been the initiator of our research agenda. I clearly remember sitting in your class as co-chair of the visualization committee in La Coruna 2005, going though several exercises you prepared to get the framework of the agenda settled. Together with our former secretary general David Fairbairn you presented the first draft in Moscow 2007, which we could later publish in many cartographic journals. The fact they you got everyone in ICA to participate in this endeavor is also due to your international reputation.

Still I tried to find some more evidence for this. This was also not too difficult since you have played several leading roles in our sister organizations like FIG and ISPRS. But those activities happened before your ICA career. Your career has been an academic one, graduating in 1977 in Architecture, followed by additional degrees in Cartography and Surveying. Tracing your academic history, your publications track record is not easy because of the many metamorphoses you last name went trough. Your CV states: Kirsi VIRRANTAUS (formerly Makkonen, Eloranta, Artimo).

But I also have my own memories, we first met in The Hague in 1985 at an UDMS conference. And since then we somehow kept in touch. Today you are even Vice Dean at the School of Engineering of the Aalto University in Espoo/Helsinki. Well enough evidence to convince this audience I believe. Kirsi, I m happy to hand you this ICA reward, congratulations.

Category: General News
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