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Special Issue: Cartographers write about Cartography, International Journal of Cartography – complete issue published on-line

Cover International Journal of CartographyThe new issue of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

 

Editorial: Cartographers Write About Cartography

The year 2020, and the COVID-19 virus presented challenges for communities worldwide.  Our Cartography and GIScience international ‘family’ was not immune to the impacts of health issues, movement restrictions and the need to operate altogether differently to what we had done in the past.  One of the impacts of restricted travel has been the re-scheduling of the ICA conference ICC2021 from June to December 2021. At the time of writing there’s hope, but not yet certainty that we can meet in person in December.

We thought that we would ‘re-position’ one of the issues of the International Journal of Cartography to provide a way that members of our international community could continue discourse about our discipline during this ‘hiatus’ in face-to-face international cartographic activities.

We have therefore allocated this second edition (7.2) for 2021 to a series of ‘invited essays’, where we invited a number of Cartographers to write about Cartography – personal essays on a particular map, geospatial product, or cartographic issue.  We (deliberately) asked invited contributors to write a short, illustrated essay, rather than a formal paper, so as to be able to express the qualities they saw as being important in a particular artefact. These are very much personal reflections.

We were interested in developing a publication that explored what we think about certain maps that move and inspire us – as cartographers and designers, as geospatial scientists and geographers.

When we look at some maps or atlases we sometimes just ‘like them’, or think they ‘work’.  They are something special.  They can work, artistically, scientifically, technically – or in all three of these areas. We generally limit our appreciation to some ‘note to self’ or by commenting about the artefact we admire to a close friend or colleague, or by a brief comment on social media.  We very rarely express our longer-form thoughts about them to a wider audience.

We believe that this Special Issue has provided the vehicle for this to occur, at least for the small proportion of cartographic works on show.

The authors that contributed to this Special Issue of the Journal were asked to pen a personal illustrated essay. We asked them to explain why their chosen map or cartographic artefact works and to provide an analysis of the attributes of the product that they believed make it successful.  Here, they were asked to emphasise why it works, even though this was perhaps a personal viewpoint, unsupported by analytical research.  If in fact why it works cannot be pinpointed, the author’s personal viewpoint was sought. (Our thinking was that maybe what they were writing about was considered to be like a piece of art – “it’s just great, but I don’t know why it works”.)

When compiling our list of ‘invitees’ we were faced with a dilemma: our discipline is one that is rich with well-respected, talented and innovative researchers and practitioners.  Looking at what they have done, and continue to do, is truly amazing.  We would have liked to invite them all!  However, our issue page limit disallowed this. So, we invited potential contributors to enable a representation of  the diverse nature of the areas of endeavour in our field, hailing from many parts of the globe, being at different stages of their careers and, importantly for us, as editors, be willing to join us on this journey.  We are glad to report that we received much interest and encouragement from invited authors, who were keen to share their passion for maps, in their many forms and applications.  The enthusiastic support from contributors confirmed our thinking that an issue like this, with a focus on personal observations of maps, would make a wonderful vehicle for promoting conversations about our field of endeavour.

We believe that this collection of essays will make an important contribution to the contemporary literature on cartography and GI science and promote discourse on these maps and cartographic artefacts. We hope it will generate pleasure and stimulate creativity. Further, that in exploring cartographic work in this way we might encourage similar approaches to other work, acknowledging the value of personal perspectives and opinion as much as scholarly critique. Both have value.

William Cartwright, Melbourne, Australia
Anne Ruas, Paris, France
Kenneth Field, Redlands, United States of America
Editors, International Journal of Cartography Special Issue – Cartographers write about Cartography

The contents of the issue are:

  • Editorial: Cartographers Write About Cartography by William Cartwright, Anne Ruas and Kenneth Field
  • The Heart of the Grand Canyon by Tom Patterson
  • OCTOPUS MAPPING one of the MADMAPS: NATO Octopus, control over the weapons’ sales by Christine Zanin and Nicolas Lambert
  • The Mediterranean Basin Map Designed by Michel Morel by Anne Ruas
  • Peeling back the layers of a school wall map: Brunhes-Deffontaines “France Forestière” by Nicholas Chrisman
  • The Unicorn of Map Projections by Sarah Battersby
  • Reinhard Maack and the Brandberg (Namibia) by Imre Demhardt
  • Linear and Painterly Expression in Topographic Works of Art during the Enlightenment by Beata Medyńska-Gulij
  • UNVEILING SOUTHERN AFRICA: JOHN BARROW’S MAP OF 1801 by Elri Liebenburg
  • Reorienting the Narrative: Chapin Jr.’s “Red China” Map by Ian Muehlenhaus
  • The Geologic Map of the Cassini Quadrangle on the Moon: Planetary Cartography Between Science, Efficacy and Cartographic Aesthetics by Andrea Naß and Stephan van Gasselt
  • Revealing the value of geospatial information with isochrone maps for improving the management of heart attacks in South Africa by Serena Coetzee, Lourens Snyman and Rhena Delport
  • Map as biography: maps, memory, and landscape – thoughts on Ordnance Survey map, Sheet TR04, 1:25,000 Provisional Edition, Ashford. by Peter Vujakovic
  • Interactive Videodiscs: Beginnings of Multimedia and Catalyst for Multimedia Cartography by William Cartwright
  • The best map ever? by Menno-Jan Kraak
  • Cartography Is Here. [full stop] by Igor Drecki
  • My first Atlas by Carla Cristina Reinaldo Gimenes de Sena
    Graphical-statistical Atlas of Switzerland, 1914 by Thomas Schultz
  • Matthew Picton’s Urban Narratives. Or how a three-dimensional paper map can beam you into the London bombing nights of 1940 by Thomas Streifeneder and Barbara Piatti
  • Seeing the “perfect world” through Heinrich Berann’s Panorama Maps of the Alps by Georg Gartner
  • The Soviet Military 1:10,000 City Plan of Dover, UK (1974) by Alexander Kent
  • Reflections on the creation of cartographic expression through the representation of elevation by Takashi Morita
  • Separating fact from fiction: the mythology of cartographic icons by Kenneth Field
  • Measuring geodetic baselines in Spain during the 1850’s by Andrés Arístegui
  • MapQuest and the beginnings of Web Cartography by Michael Peterson

 

International Journal of Cartography
Special Issue: Cartographers write about Cartography
Number 2 Volume 7 2021
ISSN:2372-9333

Category: General News

President’s Blog #8: Upcoming Deadline for Abstract Submissions for ICC2021

Dear ICA Colleagues,

The planning for the International Cartographic Conference in Florence in December is on schedule and our excitement grows in anticipation with each passing day. This is a reminder that for those wanting to submit an abstract for what promises to be an exceptional ICC2021 the extended deadline is Sunday, June 20, 2021. Please see the submission guidelines at www.icc2021.net

The number of full paper submissions for the ICC2021 for consideration as journal articles reached 100, which is an impressive record, and are now under review by the Scientific Program Committee. As you can see, there is an eagerness among all of us to explore beyond our confined spaces to meet each other in Florence.

Registration is now open on the website and you are encouraged to make your plans for attending this historic event. For the business community, this is your chance to announce to the cartographic and geospatial world that you are open for business.

Please share this information with colleagues to promote the 30th International Cartographic Conference in Florence, Italy. I look forward to seeing you in Flroence.

– Tim Trainor
President of the International Cartographic Association

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eCARTO News May 2021

eCARTO News captures the latest cartographic news and developments from around the world. If you have any general cartography items of interest then please email them to David Fraser, editor of eCARTO News.

Cartography reporting

History

Opinion

  • The Unsolved Mystery of Sri Lanka’s “Stargate” – bbc.com
  • 3 Advantages of Paper Maps Over Digital Maps – gisgeography.com
  • You Can’t Have a One to One Mapping of American History – ctexaminer.com
  • Maps can bridge gaps between citizens, scientists and policymakers – theconversation.com
  • Google Maps is About to Get a Lot More Useful – thurrott.com

Cartographic collections

  • A Guide to the Library of Congress’s Collection of Fire Insurance Maps – maproomblog.com

Cartographic Applications

Atlases and Globes

Sharing Our Cartography

Cartographic Industry News & Research & Information

World Cartographic Products

Just Maps

Odd Spot (x,y)

  • A Belgian farmer moved a rock and accidentally annexed France: the weird and wonderful history of man-made borders – abc.net.au
  • 25 Google Maps Tricks You Need to Try – au.pcmag.com
  • Kiribati & Interesting Facts About Its Geographic Anomalies – brilliantmaps.com

Kindred

 

Apply for the 2021 intake of the Cartography Master programme

The online application for the 2021 intake of the International Joint Master Program “Cartography” between four European Universities is open until May 31, 2021.

All information about the application process can be found here.

The program particularly welcomes applications from ICA member countries or regions!

Let’s go mapping for a sustainable world.

Category: Member News

eCARTO News April 2021

eCARTO News captures the latest cartographic news and developments from around the world. If you have any general cartography items of interest then please email them to David Fraser, editor of eCARTO News.

Cartographers

History

  • Bronze Age slab found in France is oldest 3D map in Europe – bbc.com
  • The Historical Importance of India’s Cartography Reforms – swarajyamag.com

Opinion

  • Digital Maps to hold the future of smart cities, autonomous cars, and much more – geospatialworld.net
  • Mapping the path to rewilding: The importance of landscape – sciencedaily.com
  • Internet Debates Worst Navigation App After Hilarious Google Maps Tweet – newsweek.com

Cartography and Society

  • Audubon Spotlight: Vero Couttee Uses Maps to Break the Cycle of Injustice – audubon.org
  • How One Man – And A Creative Map – Made A Difference In Panama’s COVID-19 Crisis – npr.org
  • First ever village-level mapping of childhood undernutrition in India reveals sharp local disparities – hsph.harvard.edu

Cartographic Applications

  • Scientists develop new mapping model to save Africa’s cycad plants from extinction – weforum.org
  • Ground and satellite observations map building damage after Beirut explosion – sciencedaily.com
  • Where is it hottest in the Triangle? Researchers set out to map urban heat islands. – newsobserver.com

Atlases

How To

Cartographic Industry News

  • Hydro International – hydro-international
  • Snap has acquired Pixel8earth, a 3D mapping developer, for $7.6M – au.news.yahoo.com
  • Exyn Technologies’ drones achieve autonomy milestone with on-board mapping – au.news.yahoo.com
  • Drone operators challenge surveyors’ turf in mapping dispute – conchovalleyhomepage.com
  • Strava personal heatmaps go 3D | Satellite imagery and in-app mapping also updated – bikeradar.com
  • Google promises better 3D maps – techcrunch.com
  • Airborne Digital Mapping Camera Market to move forward with regards to technological upgradations in the next 10 years – mccourier.com

Cartographic Trickery

  • Deepfake tech takes on satellite maps – techcrunch.com
  • Why ‘deepfake geography’ presents significant risks — and how researchers are detecting it – geekwire.com

Cartographic Reveals

Cartography Related

eCARTO News March 2021

eCARTO News captures the latest cartographic news and developments from around the world. If you have any general cartography items of interest then please email them to David Fraser, editor of eCARTO News.

Cartographers

Cartographic Standards, Guidelines and Rules

  • OGC membership approves new Community Standard: Indoor Mapping Data Format (IMDF) – ogc.org

Mapping the Environment

Online Cartography

Cartographic Discussion & Discoveries

  • Can This New Map Fix Our Distorted Views of the World? – nytimes.com
  • What scientists found while mapping underwater continent off Australia – brisbanetimes.com.au

The Psychology of Maps

Just Maps

Cartographic Industry News

Cartography Sources, Resources and Opportunities

Cartography Reads, Reviews and Rewinds

Cartography Related (perhaps!)

President’s Blog #7: Extension of Deadline for Full Papers for ICC2021

Dear ICA Colleagues,

Planning for our next International Cartographic Conference in December, 2021 continues at a rapid pace. The conference will be a hybrid event and we are planning to see many of you in Florence at the end of this year. The Scientific Program Committee of ICC2021 has received papers and abstracts that will surely add to our experiences. We realize that some of you have been working on your full paper and may have missed the original deadline for submission. To give you a little more time to finish up, the Local Organizing Committee agreed to extend the full paper deadline to Friday, April 9 April 16. An overview of all important dates can be found on the conference website: www.icc2021.net

Please share this information with colleagues to promote the 30th International Cartographic Conference in Florence, Italy.

– Tim Trainor
President of the International Cartographic Association

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Call for Papers: Coordinating Cartographic Collections

On 30 September 2021 the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography is organizing the online workshop “Coordinating Cartographic Collections”, in conjunction with the 12th Virginia Garrett Lectures on the History of Cartography (University of Texas at Arlington) and the Fall Meeting of the Texas Map Society.

The ICA Workshop, due to the varying international Covid19 situation and travel restrictions, will be an ONLINE EVENT. The 12th Virginia Garrett Lectures & Fall Meeting of the Texas Map Society, however, are planned as a HYBRID CONFERENCE from 1 to 3 October 2021 (in-person attendance and online streaming). Presenters and registered participants of the ICA Workshop will get FREE online access to this conference as well.

Call for Papers

All three connected events are exploring the incredibly diverse cosmos of maps in collections. The ICA Workshop invites personal and institutional case studies / best practice examples on the following topics (though other contributions will be considered as well):

  • collecting (trade and collector)
  • cataloguing
  • preserving
  • presenting (physical and digital)
  • access / user perspectives
  • managing (back office)

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 30 July 2021
Notification of acceptance: 13 August 2021
Guidance on abstracts: min. 200 words – max. 500 words, add a brief biographical note

Inquiries and submissions should be directed to:
Prof. Dr. Imre Josef DemhardtChair ICA Commission on the History of Cartography

Tag:

eCARTO News February 2021

eCARTO News captures the latest cartographic news and developments from around the world. If you have any general cartography items of interest then please email them to David Fraser, editor of eCARTO News.

Cartography – A World View

Cartography and History

Cartography – Viewpoints

Near Real Time Cartography

Cartographic Products

Out of This World Mapping Applications

Cartography storylines

Cartographic Industry News

Mapping the Environment

  • Un atlas pour mieux comprendre les récifs coralliens grâce à l’imagerie satellite – news.un.org
  • Geoinformation and satellite data reveal increasing rate of global ice loss – geospatialworld.net

Cartography Sources, Resources and Opportunities

Cartography Technically Speaking

Cartographic Information and Questions

Cartography Lite

Issue 7.1, 2021 of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

Cover International Journal of CartographyThe new issue of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

The contents of the issue are:

  • Editorial: Maps – essential information resources for integration, analysis and informing   William Cartwright & Anne Ruas
  • A year like no other – the ICA during the pandemic   Tim Trainor
  • The 1705 van Delft expedition to northern Australia: a toponymic perspective   Jan Tent
  • Famous charts and forgotten fragments: exploring correlations in early Portuguese nautical cartography   Bruno Almeida
  • Strengthening resilience in the Caribbean region through the Spatial Data Infrastructures   Paloma Merodio Gómez, Efrain Limones García & Andrea Ramírez Santiago
  • Minimum-error world map projections defined by polydimensional meshes   Justin H. Kunimune
  • Automating and utilising equal-distribution data classification   Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Ibad Kureshi, Kieran Lee, Ian Smith & Toni Staykova
  • Maps in History: Fighting Epidemics   Imre Josef Demhardt

Editorial: Maps – essential information resources for integration, analysis and informing

We currently live in a most awful time.  We are threatened by an invisible killer that we, as individuals and communities, must work hard to avoid, eliminate and, hopefully, eradicate.  To help us to better understand our local situation, about infections nearby, and the global situation we, as individuals, can source information from both local and global news services and publications.  This information that informs us generally includes infographics and maps.  These graphical, and geo-graphical information communication methods support and enhance the information that we mostly receive through the written word and tabulated number counts.

Data provided by  esteemed medical research facilities and governmental agencies are the sources for mapped information. For example, The New York Times provides information on the COVID-19 virus information via their ‘Coronavirus World map: Tracking the Global Outbreak” website.  Infographics and maps (generated via Mapbox), includes global information on hot spots, total cases, deaths and virus cases per capita (country-by-country).  The site brings-together information from local governments, The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at John Hopkins University, the National Health Commission of the PRC and the Wold Health Organisation. And, for the USA, the newspaper provides similar virus-related data (again using infographics and maps) on a state-by-state and county basis: trends in virus growth, vaccine rollout figures and the national situation generally.  This is repeated in a similar fashion by other major internationally-respected newspapers, as well as news services like Bloomberg, Reuters, BBC, CNN and France 24.   As well, our local newspapers and television news reports provide similar, more focussed information.  Maps are prominent in these news stories and reports, and they are used to inform us about the geographical reach of COVID-19.

It’s times like these that we need to better understand the impact of COVID-19 and the efforts being made to confront this challenge to humanity. Mapping has, and is, playing a major role for information collection, integration, analysis and informing. This utilisation of contemporary mapping services, whereby data can be sourced globally, and then presented to citizens, via print or digital media, illustrates the power of these mediums to better provide tools for decision-makers and to inform the general public.

In this issue, as part of the on-going column: Maps in history, Imre Demhardt provides some context about the use of maps as a tool for managing epidemics and developing strategic responses and spatially-informed strategies in his contribution,  ‘Fighting Epidemics’.  Professor Demhardt notes in his article that it wasn’t until the seventeenth century that printed maps were used as a tool to fight epidemics.  He provides examples from Bari on the Apulian coast of the Adriatic in the then Kingdom of Naples in 1690, New York City in 1795 and 1797 and London, 1849 and 1854.  This piece illustrates the usefulness of maps, historically, and we can reflect upon their usefulness today.

Other papers in this edition include a contribution from Jan Trent  – The 1705 van Delft expedition to northern Australia: A toponymic perspective.  The paper outlines the 1705 voyage of Dutch explorer Maerten van Delft, and the examination of the subsequent manuscript chart and report by two Councillors of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in Batavia. The paper reports on the findings of research that was undertaken to compare the differences between the two historic records and motivations behind the naming of locations.

Bruno Almeida provides another historically-focussed paper – Famous Charts and Forgotten Fragments: Exploring Correlations in Early Portuguese Nautical Cartography.  Research was undertaken to ascertain the links between two anonymous early sixteenth century portolan charts: the portolan chart at the Bibliothèque Municipale of Dijon and a fragment of a chart from the Archive at Torre do Tombo, Lisbon.  As well, the research investigated the links between these two charts and the Kunstmann III chart.  This was completed using a comparative study and cartometric methods to access their implicit geometry.

Strengthening resilience in the Caribbean region through the spatial data infrastructures, by Andrea Paloma Merodio Gómez, Efrain Limones García & Andrea Ramírez Santiago provides information relating to the methodology and the results from the assessment of the initial status of the SDIs of the member of the Association of Caribbean States.  The research undertaken also assessed the activities carried out for Strengthening these National SDIs, user satisfaction of improvements that had been made and provided recommendations for strengthening the use of geospatial information for regional decision-making.

Justin H. Kunimune, in his paper Minimum-error world map projections defined by polydimensional meshes, presents a method that uses multi-dimensional optimization to optimize piecewise map projections, based on interpolation onto unstructured meshes.  These map projections are presented as the Danseiji projections, along with their potential applications. The results of the research reported are demonstrated using several new map projections. These map projections are presented as the Danseiji projections, along with their potential applications.

Equal-distribution data classification for studying relationships between spatial phenomena, is contributed by Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Ibad Kureshi, Kieran Lee, Ian Smith and Toni Staykova.  The paper outlines and develops their proposal of a data classification method for choropleth maps that defines intervals so that some quantity represented by values of another attribute is equally distributed among the classes. They consider that this approach may be most useful when the distribution of the phenomenon is very unequal, with many data items having zero or low quantities and quite a few items having larger quantities.  The method developed is demonstrated by analysing data that referred to a set of spatially distributed people (patients) in relationship to characteristics of the areas where they are domiciled.

William Cartwright, Melbourne, Australia
Anne Ruas, Paris, France
Editors, International Journal of Cartography

Category: General News
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