Welcome to the International Cartographic Association
The ICA Executive Committee and Commission Chairs at the first meeting of the 2019–2023 term in Gent, BelgiumWelcome to the website of the International Cartographic AssociationView our poster series as a contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals View our poster series as a contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals
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Welcome to the website of the International Cartographic Association
View our poster series as a contribution to the Sustainable Development

eCARTO News February 2021

eCARTO News captures the latest cartographic news and developments from around the world. If you have any general cartography items of interest then please email them to David Fraser, editor of eCARTO News.

Cartography – A World View

Cartography and History

Cartography – Viewpoints

Near Real Time Cartography

Cartographic Products

Out of This World Mapping Applications

Cartography storylines

Cartographic Industry News

Mapping the Environment

  • Un atlas pour mieux comprendre les récifs coralliens grâce à l’imagerie satellite – news.un.org
  • Geoinformation and satellite data reveal increasing rate of global ice loss – geospatialworld.net

Cartography Sources, Resources and Opportunities

Cartography Technically Speaking

Cartographic Information and Questions

Cartography Lite

Issue 7.1, 2021 of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

Cover International Journal of CartographyThe new issue of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

The contents of the issue are:

  • Editorial: Maps – essential information resources for integration, analysis and informing   William Cartwright & Anne Ruas
  • A year like no other – the ICA during the pandemic   Tim Trainor
  • The 1705 van Delft expedition to northern Australia: a toponymic perspective   Jan Tent
  • Famous charts and forgotten fragments: exploring correlations in early Portuguese nautical cartography   Bruno Almeida
  • Strengthening resilience in the Caribbean region through the Spatial Data Infrastructures   Paloma Merodio Gómez, Efrain Limones García & Andrea Ramírez Santiago
  • Minimum-error world map projections defined by polydimensional meshes   Justin H. Kunimune
  • Automating and utilising equal-distribution data classification   Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Ibad Kureshi, Kieran Lee, Ian Smith & Toni Staykova
  • Maps in History: Fighting Epidemics   Imre Josef Demhardt

Editorial: Maps – essential information resources for integration, analysis and informing

We currently live in a most awful time.  We are threatened by an invisible killer that we, as individuals and communities, must work hard to avoid, eliminate and, hopefully, eradicate.  To help us to better understand our local situation, about infections nearby, and the global situation we, as individuals, can source information from both local and global news services and publications.  This information that informs us generally includes infographics and maps.  These graphical, and geo-graphical information communication methods support and enhance the information that we mostly receive through the written word and tabulated number counts.

Data provided by  esteemed medical research facilities and governmental agencies are the sources for mapped information. For example, The New York Times provides information on the COVID-19 virus information via their ‘Coronavirus World map: Tracking the Global Outbreak” website.  Infographics and maps (generated via Mapbox), includes global information on hot spots, total cases, deaths and virus cases per capita (country-by-country).  The site brings-together information from local governments, The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at John Hopkins University, the National Health Commission of the PRC and the Wold Health Organisation. And, for the USA, the newspaper provides similar virus-related data (again using infographics and maps) on a state-by-state and county basis: trends in virus growth, vaccine rollout figures and the national situation generally.  This is repeated in a similar fashion by other major internationally-respected newspapers, as well as news services like Bloomberg, Reuters, BBC, CNN and France 24.   As well, our local newspapers and television news reports provide similar, more focussed information.  Maps are prominent in these news stories and reports, and they are used to inform us about the geographical reach of COVID-19.

It’s times like these that we need to better understand the impact of COVID-19 and the efforts being made to confront this challenge to humanity. Mapping has, and is, playing a major role for information collection, integration, analysis and informing. This utilisation of contemporary mapping services, whereby data can be sourced globally, and then presented to citizens, via print or digital media, illustrates the power of these mediums to better provide tools for decision-makers and to inform the general public.

In this issue, as part of the on-going column: Maps in history, Imre Demhardt provides some context about the use of maps as a tool for managing epidemics and developing strategic responses and spatially-informed strategies in his contribution,  ‘Fighting Epidemics’.  Professor Demhardt notes in his article that it wasn’t until the seventeenth century that printed maps were used as a tool to fight epidemics.  He provides examples from Bari on the Apulian coast of the Adriatic in the then Kingdom of Naples in 1690, New York City in 1795 and 1797 and London, 1849 and 1854.  This piece illustrates the usefulness of maps, historically, and we can reflect upon their usefulness today.

Other papers in this edition include a contribution from Jan Trent  – The 1705 van Delft expedition to northern Australia: A toponymic perspective.  The paper outlines the 1705 voyage of Dutch explorer Maerten van Delft, and the examination of the subsequent manuscript chart and report by two Councillors of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in Batavia. The paper reports on the findings of research that was undertaken to compare the differences between the two historic records and motivations behind the naming of locations.

Bruno Almeida provides another historically-focussed paper – Famous Charts and Forgotten Fragments: Exploring Correlations in Early Portuguese Nautical Cartography.  Research was undertaken to ascertain the links between two anonymous early sixteenth century portolan charts: the portolan chart at the Bibliothèque Municipale of Dijon and a fragment of a chart from the Archive at Torre do Tombo, Lisbon.  As well, the research investigated the links between these two charts and the Kunstmann III chart.  This was completed using a comparative study and cartometric methods to access their implicit geometry.

Strengthening resilience in the Caribbean region through the spatial data infrastructures, by Andrea Paloma Merodio Gómez, Efrain Limones García & Andrea Ramírez Santiago provides information relating to the methodology and the results from the assessment of the initial status of the SDIs of the member of the Association of Caribbean States.  The research undertaken also assessed the activities carried out for Strengthening these National SDIs, user satisfaction of improvements that had been made and provided recommendations for strengthening the use of geospatial information for regional decision-making.

Justin H. Kunimune, in his paper Minimum-error world map projections defined by polydimensional meshes, presents a method that uses multi-dimensional optimization to optimize piecewise map projections, based on interpolation onto unstructured meshes.  These map projections are presented as the Danseiji projections, along with their potential applications. The results of the research reported are demonstrated using several new map projections. These map projections are presented as the Danseiji projections, along with their potential applications.

Equal-distribution data classification for studying relationships between spatial phenomena, is contributed by Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Ibad Kureshi, Kieran Lee, Ian Smith and Toni Staykova.  The paper outlines and develops their proposal of a data classification method for choropleth maps that defines intervals so that some quantity represented by values of another attribute is equally distributed among the classes. They consider that this approach may be most useful when the distribution of the phenomenon is very unequal, with many data items having zero or low quantities and quite a few items having larger quantities.  The method developed is demonstrated by analysing data that referred to a set of spatially distributed people (patients) in relationship to characteristics of the areas where they are domiciled.

William Cartwright, Melbourne, Australia
Anne Ruas, Paris, France
Editors, International Journal of Cartography

Category: General News

ICA News 75 now online

ICA News, Number 75, December 2020

We are pleased to announce that the 75th issue of the ICA News is now available for download:

This issue of ICA News brings you another update on ICC 2021, reports on the meeting of ICA Executive Committee with chairs of the ICA Commissions and Working Groups, and farewells Keith Smith, National Secretary of the Mapping Sciences Institute Australia. Thank you again for your continuous support and contributions.

– Igor Drecki, Editor ICA News

Category: General News
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New book on the Barbara Petchenik Competition

The Spanish Ministry of Transports, Mobility and the Urban Agenda, through the National Geographic Institute of Spain and the Spanish Centre for Geographic Information, has published the book “The World drawn by children. Barbara Petchenik International Competitions 2017 & 2019 / El mundo dibujado por los niños. Concursos Internacionales Barbara Petchenik 2017 y 2019”. It has been released on the occasion of the International Day of Women and Girls in Science on the 11th of February 2021 and aiming to pay tribute to all women and girls dedicated to or interested in Geography and Cartography.

Furthermore, the organiser of these competitions, the International Cartographic Association (ICA), wished to dedicate this publication to the National Geographic Institute of Spain as a tribute to the 150th anniversary of its foundation back in 1870. Its bilingual (English/Spanish) digital version is available from today in the publication section of the Institute’s website. The printed version will be released soon.

The book has been produced by the National Geographic Institute of Spain and it has been published by the Spanish Centre for Geographic Information. It has been created thanks to the valuable contribution of the ICA Commission on Cartography & Children and the remarkable cooperation of the Spanish Society for Cartography, Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, which represents Spain at the ICA. However, above all, it could only come into fruition thanks to the wonderful drawings made by children competing in the 2017 and 2019 editions. It also features the pictures regards Barbara Petchenik’s biography accomplished by illustrator Santiago N. Fernández, on loan from the National Geographic Institute of Argentina.

Barbara Petchenik (1939-1992), American cartographer, is an extraordinary example in the task of bringing together science and values, i.e. she was the first woman to serve as Vice-President of the ICA, she was involved in several projects with an exceptional scientific output in the field of cartography, and she worked hard to make maps, her great passion, part of regular education from childhood.



Illustrated details about the life of Barbara Petchenik

There could be no better occasion than today, the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, to present the values that guide the international competition that is embodied in this book, in which the main characters are both the World drawn by children and the love for maps.

The Archive for the Barbara Petchenik Children Map Competitions is kept at Carleton University Library (Canada), and can be viewed at https://childrensmaps.library.carleton.ca/. The aims of this international competition are to promote creative representation of the world as seen by schoolchildren, to strengthen geographic and cartographic knowledge and to make participants aware of the world in which they live, favouring understanding and preservation.

The publication of the book also aims to promote the 2021 edition of this international competition, whose theme this time is “A map of my future world”. All Spanish children will be able to participate in this new competition. The Spanish Society for Cartography, Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, ICA’s representative in Spain, will receive the drawings and will select the six best national works, which will represent Spain in the international edition. The final decision will take place from 14 to 18 December 2021 in Florence (Italy), simultaneously with the celebration of the 30th International Cartography Conference.

Mapping for a Sustainable World

Dear colleagues,

It is with great pleasure we present you the book “Mapping for a Sustainable World”, a co-publication by the United Nations and the International Cartographic Association. This co-insides with today’s International Day of Education (24 January 2021).

In 2015, the United Nations identified 17 Sustainable Development Goals (henceforth SDGs) in an effort to address, collectively, the most pressing problems facing our world. The SDGs relate to broad social, economic, and environmental challenges, and provide a framework for shared action. Each of the seventeen SDGs has a set of targets and indicators to assist countries towards meeting the goal. To achieve the SDGs, governments and people need to understand each challenge and monitor progress towards alleviating it.

Inspired by this initiative and eager to contribute ICA started a map poster project in 2015. It cumulated in a map exhibition at the United Nations Headquarters in 2016. This book project, executed in together with the Geospatial Information Section of the United Nations, can be considered the follow-up of the map poster project.

Drawing from cartography, the book offers guidelines for mapping geographic datasets related to the SDGs by introducing basic principles of map design and use, discussing established best practices and conventions, and explaining how different mapping techniques support understanding of the SDGs.

The book comprises four sections. Section 1 introduces the SDGs and their relation to geospatial data, describing SDG indicators and data transformations for mapping. Section 2 describes foundational design decisions in the cartographic workflow, including projections, scale, generalization, symbolization, typography, and visual hierarchy, among others. Section 3 introduces the common map types (e.g., choropleths, proportional symbols, dasymetric maps, bivariate maps, cartograms) and diagrams (e.g., bar graphs, scatterplots, timelines) for representing the SDG indicators. Finally, Section 4 discusses considerations for map use environments, such as audiences, user interfaces and interaction operators, mobile and web media, storytelling versus exploration, and open access.

The book has an editorial team comprising writers from the International Cartographic Association (ICA) and the Geospatial Information Section of the United Nations (UN). The book is published as an open access document according to the CC-BY-NC license. When drawing from or reusing text or figures from this book, attribute/cite as follows Kraak MJ, RE Roth, B Ricker, A Kagawa, and G Le Sourd. 2020. Mapping for a Sustainable World. The United Nations: New York, NY (USA). The institutes of the editors (University of Twente / ITC, University of Wisconsin-Madison), and the UW Cartography Laboratory (design and layout), and the United Nations Geospatial Information Section have made the necessary resources available to realize the book.

The pdf-version of the book can be downloaded from the page accessible via the following link https://www.un.org/geospatial/programmes. A direct DOI link will follow. A printed version is in preparation. At a later stage we plan to also release all data used to create the maps in the book.

Menno-Jan Kraak (ICA)
Robert E. Roth (ICA)
Britta Ricker (ICA)
Ayako Kagawa (UN)
Guillaume Le Sourd (UN)

Category: General News

eCARTO News January 2021

eCARTO News captures the latest cartographic news and developments from around the world. If you have any general cartography items of interest then please email them to David Fraser, editor of eCARTO News.

Featured Cartography

Cartography – Not the study of cartoons

Themed Cartography

Old maps – Eye Candy

  • Abbey Sanctuary and Environs of Holyrood – maps.nls.uk
  • Planisphaerivm Aratevm sive Compages Orbivm Mvndanorvm ex hypothesi Aratea in plano expressa. – loc.gov
  • Have you seen the first known map of Ireland from 140AD? – irishcentral.com
  • Every map ever published in the National Geographic magazine since the first issue in October 1888 – nationalgeographic.com
  • 20 Best Maps of 2020 – vividmaps.com

Cartographic Discussions

  • Something in the water: the mythology of Snow’s map of cholera – esri.com

Mapping Applications

  • New mangrove forest mapping tool puts conservation in reach of coastal communities – theconversation.com
  • Satellite mapping used to tackle social isolation ‘hotspots’ in UK cities – techrepublic.com
  • 72-ft autonomous Saildrone sets out on seafloor-mapping mission – newatlas.com

Modelling

Cartographic Industry News

Cartographic Animations & 3D Images

  • Into the eye of the storm: Nexrad Level II open data – mapbox.com
  • Introducing Unfolded Studio – The Platform for Geospatial Analytics – unfolded.ai
  • Citizen scientists create 3D map of brown dwarfs in our sun’s neighbourhood – space.com
  • Mapbox launches 3D Maps with 135 million sq km of global, high-resolution imagery from Maxar – finance.yahoo.com

Cartography Sources, Resources and Opportunities

Cartographic Exhibitions & Discussions

Cartography – A World View

Transport Cartography

Cartography Lite

Workshop on Adaptable Research Methods For Empirical Research with Map Users

The ICA Commission on Cognitive Issues in Geographic Information Visualization and the ICA Commission on User Experience are pleased to invite you an online workshop on Adaptable Research Methods For Empirical Research with Map Users on Thursday, 6 May 2021.

Everyone globally has been affected by the COVID-19 in one way or another. Most of us have probably had to make adjustments to planned research projects as a result of restrictions on mobility and interacting with people outside our own households.

Nevertheless, despite these challenges, people have been successful in undertaking research. We believe that there have probably been a number of creative solutions devised for running experiments that gather empirical data from people, and some of these solutions may be well worth preserving for use in the future.

Therefore we propose a workshop to share some of our collective experiences in doing this kind of work over the last 14 months. We hope to learn from each others’ successes and failures and contribute constructive suggestions for yet-to-be-solved problems presented by the situation.

Workshop format

We expect everyone attending the workshop to actively participate in the sharing and discussions. This could mean that you present a lightning talk about a problem you need help solving (we are looking at you, PhD students!), or it could mean you discuss an experience that didn’t work as you hoped/planned, or it could mean that you present a solution that worked well for you and that might help others.

We plan that the session will be relaxed and relatively informal as not all experiences may be easy to share in a standard, formal scientific presentation. For example, some experiences may be easier to communicate via demonstration. Therefore, we ask when you submit your abstract, you also specify how much time you would like and how you would like to spend your time.

Some possible options include:

  • Standard presentation
  • Demonstrating a technique or method you’ve devised
  • Facilitating a discussion about particular types of challenges you’ve wrestled with (to best do this, provide discussion points/questions that workshop participants can reflect on before the workshop);
  • Other creative uses of the time that you can negotiate with the workshop organisers – we are open to ideas!

Workshop Outcomes

We plan at a minimum to build a webpage to be hosted on the Commission website with a synthesis of the ideas presented at the workshop. It is hard to predict in advance if there will be sufficient material, but if it seems to be the case after the workshop, we suggest also the development of a collaborative paper to be submitted to the International Journal of Cartography.

Deadline for abstracts

We ask that you submit your abstract by 28 February 2021 (Anywhere on Earth) to this website.

We will use the ICA Abstracts template, which can be accessed at Copernicus. Note, you should NOT provide a paper – use only the abstract component of the template! Your abstract should be no longer than 500 words.

Schedule

Date(s): Thursday 6 May; additionally Friday 7 May (if demand is great enough).
Time: 22:00-2:00 (AUS), 20:00-0:00 (Beijing), 14:00-18:00 (CET), 13:00-17:00 (UK); 9:00-13:00 (Rio de Janeiro); 8:00-12:00 (East Coast US); 5:00-9:00 (West Coast US)

We have planned a half-day workshop on Thursday 6 May. If there is sufficient enthusiasm for participation based on the responses to the CFP, we have tentatively planned to extend the workshop to a second half-day on Friday 7 May.

There is no time of day that will perfectly suit all time zones, so we have tried to come up with a schedule that allows the greatest number of time zones to attend at least some of the workshop at an at least semi-civilised hour.

Cost

There is no cost for participation, but we ask that you register in advance by 31 March 2021 to support the logistical planning of the workshop. The registration link will be provided here at this website in March.

Workshop Platform

The platform we use will depend on registered numbers, but either Teams or Remo are being considered. We will advise the platform to all registered participants before the workshop.

Organizers

ICA Commission on Cognitive Issues in Geographic Information Visualization

  • Dr. Amy Griffin, RMIT University
  • Dr. Petr Kubíček, Masaryk University
  • Dr. Pyry Kettunen, Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI, NLS)

ICA Commission on User Experience

  • Prof. Rob Roth, University of Wisconsin Madison
  • Prof. Luciene Delazari, Federal Univ. of Paraná
  • Dr. Zdeněk Stachoň, Masaryk University
  • Katarzyna Słomska-Przech, University of Warsaw

Series of Conversations around Maps and Stories

Sensibility Mapping of Rwandan Life Stories by Élise Olmed

The Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling (COHDS) in collaboration with the Geomedia lab at Concordia University is organizing a series of conversations around maps and stories. These conversations will involve students, researchers, mapmakers, artists, and activists working at the intersection between maps and stories, and will aim to address two broad questions: What are the most pressing methodological, theoretical, technological, ethical and design challenges raised by the relationships between maps and stories? What might be the impacts of these relationships within the social, cultural and political spheres? This series of conversations will take place online and will be freely accessible.

List of conversations

Feb. 3, 2021 (12:00 to 13:30 Eastern) – Reflections on cartographic languages when collectively mapping possible worlds

  • Séverin Halder – Activist, geographer & co-editor of “This Is Not an Atlas”
  • Paul Schweizer – Geographer, popular educator & co-editor of “This Is Not an Atlas”
  • Pablo Mansilla Quiñones – Associate Professor, Institute of Geography. Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaiso.

Registration: https://concordia-ca.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAvcOuvpzMiG9GqsMlDlxEq_50w_qi20MVn?fbclid=IwAR0OkpwQTbOrT4q904C_5-qgBuavD-qZbrUN4upD1nALojbP4tLjd99KSqk

Feb. 25, 2021 (12:00 to 13:30 Eastern) – Listening

  • Anne Knowles – Historical geographer & professor of history at University of Maine
  • Margaret Pearce – Citizen Potawatomi Nation tribal member and cartographer

Registration: https://concordia-ca.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwkceCqpjgrHtB3rSdJ5TmXnPYef_NjPGTt?fbclid=IwAR0qMhXJplcAaI4znvDdHn6KI3R5Kb7C-ht9_gpjrH1i24cCgVgkFcTmzts

March 23, 2021 (14:30-16:00 Eastern) Weaving stories threads: An Indigenous Cartographic Engagement

  • Annita Lucchesi – Cheyenne & PhD student at the University of Arizona
  • Pualani Louis – Kanaka ʻŌiwi & Associate Researcher with UC Davis Native American Studies

Registration: https://concordia-ca.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUudOisrTgoEt0YDodiAdFuhqNf69gkwhQs?fbclid=IwAR3q-31EaaPzVaVTEfBvzmU_sN6UXuHEZzaYLicnZC9oL-NKsLTfbaO85Fk

April 8, 2021 (12:00 to 13:30 Eastern) – Mapping the Skin and the Guts of Exile’s Stories

  • Élise Olmedo – Banting Postdoctoral fellow at Concordia University
  • Sébastien Caquard – Associate Professor of Geography & co-director of the Center for Oral History and Digital storytelling (COHDS) at Concordia University

Registration: https://concordia-ca.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEtf-uhrTkpEtMbdfOcgBpXuAVF_QClEa2d?fbclid=IwAR3HnsR5XNGnmNg0-evexVyLoWVcm_hrd_N2OgQy6ZMlO9fSqMWqeiOap4Q

June 3, 2021 (12:00 to 13:30 Eastern) – Speaking (with) maps: A threefold map-talk on cartographic objects, narratives and migrancies

  • Tania Rossetto – Associate Professor of Cultural Geography & Co-convenor of the Mobility & Humanities Centre, University of Padua
  • Laura Lo Presti – Postdoc Researcher, University of Padua & ICOG Visiting Research Fellow, University of Groeningen
  • Giada Peterle – Lecturer in Literary Geography, University of Padua

Registration: https://concordia-ca.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZItfu2oqzksGdw9Pkjyz9NTp-3wlPOwdYZ-?fbclid=IwAR2CNO_5dzzXUNilSsesq1EBS4CPWDWTjH4mzcz7LqBvQMpWluiJf-yJWqQ

President’s Blog #6: Revised Dates for Papers and Abstracts for ICC2021

Dear ICA Colleagues,

In my last blog post, I mentioned the decision to move the dates for the ICC2021 in Florence Italy from July to December 14-18, 2021 in response to the current effects of the pandemic. With this extended period, the ICC2021 Local Organizing Committee very recently revised the dates for submitting full papers and abstracts. The new dates are posted on the website and also are provided below:

Full Papers Submission ClosingMarch 19, 2021
Abstracts Submission ClosingMay 28, 2021
Notification Of Acceptance For Full PapersJuly 2, 2021
Notification Of Acceptance For AbstractsJuly 2, 2021
Submission Of Final ManuscriptsJuly 30, 2021

Please share this information with colleagues to promote the 30th International Cartographic Conference in Florence, Italy.

– Tim Trainor
President of the International Cartographic Association

 


A former version of this post listed a wrong deadline for abstracts. The correct date is May 28. We apologize for the error.

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President’s Blog #5: Announcing New Dates for ICC2021

Dear ICA Colleagues,

What better way to celebrate the New Year than to announce that the International Cartographic Conference will take place December 14-18, 2021 in Florence, Italy. The change in dates reflects careful planning on the part of the Italian Cartographic Society’s Local Organizing Committee (LOC). It was originally scheduled for July 2021. We all can appreciate how difficult it is to plan the timing for a conference during the pandemic, especially when trying to maneuver the timing of an event that allows for an in-person conference. After much deliberation, the month of July was deemed too risky. The organizers and the ICA Executive Committee concluded and agreed to move the date five months later to December. With so much economic uncertainty, the LOC also planned for and have now settled on a new location in Florence for the event – The University of Florence. The University’s central location, accessibility, and facilities combine to meet all of the conference needs for the ICA.

The change in dates together with a new venue are the reasons for the recent uncertainty regarding published deadlines for papers, abstracts, and the International Map Exhibition. We expect that you will understand the many challenges faced by the LOC and the ICA Executive Committee when several fundamental assumptions in planning a large international event suddenly went amiss because of the pandemic’s long reach.

Announcing a Hybrid Conference Opportunity

The ICC2021 will be a hybrid conference – a chance to participate in person or via remote access. This is the first time that the ICA has offered such a choice. A hybrid event opens access to more participants and now makes it possible for those unable to travel or with limited resources to experience the benefits of an international cartographic event, as long as you have internet access. This is a recent decision and specific details are being formulated to help you decide on your attendance preferences. We anticipate that the hybrid option will highlight selected program content and will not include the full program. Conference registration rates will reflect these distinctions. As more details are decided, information will be posted to the conference website. Future President blogs also will highlight these options and opportunities on the ICA website.

Next steps for each of us

  1. Review the conference website for recent information on deadlines and details. Periodically check the website for updates and new information.
  2. Authors planning to submit a full paper for review have an approaching deadline of January 15. The organizers anticipate that those who are considering this option have been working on their paper to meet prior deadlines and can now submit their work for review by the ICC Scientific Program Committee. If a short extension is needed, please contact the Scientific Program Committee.
  3. The abstract submission deadline is March 26 for consideration either as a full paper in the Proceedings or as stand-alone published abstract. See the ICC website for details.
  4. Conference registration options will be decided soon and will be available to you.
  5. ICA Members (countries and affiliate members) who plan to submit cartographic examples for the International Cartographic Exhibition, see the guidelines at https://www.icc2021.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/ICC_2021_Guidelines_201204_web.pdf.
  6. Sponsors, exhibitors, businesses, and associations that plan to have a presence at the ICC2021, please contact the LOC and check the conference website for details. This international conference is a great opportunity to make your mark in the rebirth of your enterprise coming out of the pandemic.

Contact LOC: https://www.icc2021.net/contacts/

I hope that this information has been informative and helpful. More information will follow but this is a great start for our collective efforts in 2021. I cannot explain to you how excited I am in looking forward to seeing you in Florence in December 2021. Until the next time…

– Tim Trainor
President of the International Cartographic Association

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