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The ICA Executive Committee and Commission Chairs at the first meeting of the 2019–2023 term in Gent, BelgiumWelcome to the website of the International Cartographic AssociationView our poster series as a contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals View our poster series as a contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals
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Welcome to the website of the International Cartographic Association
View our poster series as a contribution to the Sustainable Development

Announcement: First ICA Webinar on Mapping for a Sustainable World

The United Nations identified seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in an effort to address the most pressing problems facing our world. Well-designed maps and diagrams can assist in achieving these goals.

With this in mind the International Cartographic Association together with United Nations Geospatial Information Section has written the book Mapping for a Sustainable World. It offers guidelines for mapping geographic datasets related to the SDGs at both regional and global scales. Applied examples and open data that can be used in Geography coursework as well as best practices for cartographic design are presented throughout the book.

The authors of the book will take you on a journey of the timeline of the creation of the book and will share their experiences. We look at the creation, the content and the use of the book.

This webinar taking place on July 14, 2021 at 16:00 CET, will be of interest to those who want to create and use “SDG maps” to achieve a Sustainable World in the classroom and beyond and are interested in Open Education.

Register in advance for this meeting: https://utwente-nl.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEkcu6tpzotEtPSSfpqSYDm83XSLcjzH124
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Category: General News

Special Issue: Cartographers write about Cartography, International Journal of Cartography – complete issue published on-line

Cover International Journal of CartographyThe new issue of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

 

Editorial: Cartographers Write About Cartography

The year 2020, and the COVID-19 virus presented challenges for communities worldwide.  Our Cartography and GIScience international ‘family’ was not immune to the impacts of health issues, movement restrictions and the need to operate altogether differently to what we had done in the past.  One of the impacts of restricted travel has been the re-scheduling of the ICA conference ICC2021 from June to December 2021. At the time of writing there’s hope, but not yet certainty that we can meet in person in December.

We thought that we would ‘re-position’ one of the issues of the International Journal of Cartography to provide a way that members of our international community could continue discourse about our discipline during this ‘hiatus’ in face-to-face international cartographic activities.

We have therefore allocated this second edition (7.2) for 2021 to a series of ‘invited essays’, where we invited a number of Cartographers to write about Cartography – personal essays on a particular map, geospatial product, or cartographic issue.  We (deliberately) asked invited contributors to write a short, illustrated essay, rather than a formal paper, so as to be able to express the qualities they saw as being important in a particular artefact. These are very much personal reflections.

We were interested in developing a publication that explored what we think about certain maps that move and inspire us – as cartographers and designers, as geospatial scientists and geographers.

When we look at some maps or atlases we sometimes just ‘like them’, or think they ‘work’.  They are something special.  They can work, artistically, scientifically, technically – or in all three of these areas. We generally limit our appreciation to some ‘note to self’ or by commenting about the artefact we admire to a close friend or colleague, or by a brief comment on social media.  We very rarely express our longer-form thoughts about them to a wider audience.

We believe that this Special Issue has provided the vehicle for this to occur, at least for the small proportion of cartographic works on show.

The authors that contributed to this Special Issue of the Journal were asked to pen a personal illustrated essay. We asked them to explain why their chosen map or cartographic artefact works and to provide an analysis of the attributes of the product that they believed make it successful.  Here, they were asked to emphasise why it works, even though this was perhaps a personal viewpoint, unsupported by analytical research.  If in fact why it works cannot be pinpointed, the author’s personal viewpoint was sought. (Our thinking was that maybe what they were writing about was considered to be like a piece of art – “it’s just great, but I don’t know why it works”.)

When compiling our list of ‘invitees’ we were faced with a dilemma: our discipline is one that is rich with well-respected, talented and innovative researchers and practitioners.  Looking at what they have done, and continue to do, is truly amazing.  We would have liked to invite them all!  However, our issue page limit disallowed this. So, we invited potential contributors to enable a representation of  the diverse nature of the areas of endeavour in our field, hailing from many parts of the globe, being at different stages of their careers and, importantly for us, as editors, be willing to join us on this journey.  We are glad to report that we received much interest and encouragement from invited authors, who were keen to share their passion for maps, in their many forms and applications.  The enthusiastic support from contributors confirmed our thinking that an issue like this, with a focus on personal observations of maps, would make a wonderful vehicle for promoting conversations about our field of endeavour.

We believe that this collection of essays will make an important contribution to the contemporary literature on cartography and GI science and promote discourse on these maps and cartographic artefacts. We hope it will generate pleasure and stimulate creativity. Further, that in exploring cartographic work in this way we might encourage similar approaches to other work, acknowledging the value of personal perspectives and opinion as much as scholarly critique. Both have value.

William Cartwright, Melbourne, Australia
Anne Ruas, Paris, France
Kenneth Field, Redlands, United States of America
Editors, International Journal of Cartography Special Issue – Cartographers write about Cartography

The contents of the issue are:

  • Editorial: Cartographers Write About Cartography by William Cartwright, Anne Ruas and Kenneth Field
  • The Heart of the Grand Canyon by Tom Patterson
  • OCTOPUS MAPPING one of the MADMAPS: NATO Octopus, control over the weapons’ sales by Christine Zanin and Nicolas Lambert
  • The Mediterranean Basin Map Designed by Michel Morel by Anne Ruas
  • Peeling back the layers of a school wall map: Brunhes-Deffontaines “France Forestière” by Nicholas Chrisman
  • The Unicorn of Map Projections by Sarah Battersby
  • Reinhard Maack and the Brandberg (Namibia) by Imre Demhardt
  • Linear and Painterly Expression in Topographic Works of Art during the Enlightenment by Beata Medyńska-Gulij
  • UNVEILING SOUTHERN AFRICA: JOHN BARROW’S MAP OF 1801 by Elri Liebenburg
  • Reorienting the Narrative: Chapin Jr.’s “Red China” Map by Ian Muehlenhaus
  • The Geologic Map of the Cassini Quadrangle on the Moon: Planetary Cartography Between Science, Efficacy and Cartographic Aesthetics by Andrea Naß and Stephan van Gasselt
  • Revealing the value of geospatial information with isochrone maps for improving the management of heart attacks in South Africa by Serena Coetzee, Lourens Snyman and Rhena Delport
  • Map as biography: maps, memory, and landscape – thoughts on Ordnance Survey map, Sheet TR04, 1:25,000 Provisional Edition, Ashford. by Peter Vujakovic
  • Interactive Videodiscs: Beginnings of Multimedia and Catalyst for Multimedia Cartography by William Cartwright
  • The best map ever? by Menno-Jan Kraak
  • Cartography Is Here. [full stop] by Igor Drecki
  • My first Atlas by Carla Cristina Reinaldo Gimenes de Sena
    Graphical-statistical Atlas of Switzerland, 1914 by Thomas Schultz
  • Matthew Picton’s Urban Narratives. Or how a three-dimensional paper map can beam you into the London bombing nights of 1940 by Thomas Streifeneder and Barbara Piatti
  • Seeing the “perfect world” through Heinrich Berann’s Panorama Maps of the Alps by Georg Gartner
  • The Soviet Military 1:10,000 City Plan of Dover, UK (1974) by Alexander Kent
  • Reflections on the creation of cartographic expression through the representation of elevation by Takashi Morita
  • Separating fact from fiction: the mythology of cartographic icons by Kenneth Field
  • Measuring geodetic baselines in Spain during the 1850’s by Andrés Arístegui
  • MapQuest and the beginnings of Web Cartography by Michael Peterson

 

International Journal of Cartography
Special Issue: Cartographers write about Cartography
Number 2 Volume 7 2021
ISSN:2372-9333

Category: General News

Apply for the 2021 intake of the Cartography Master programme

The online application for the 2021 intake of the International Joint Master Program “Cartography” between four European Universities is open until May 31, 2021.

All information about the application process can be found here.

The program particularly welcomes applications from ICA member countries or regions!

Let’s go mapping for a sustainable world.

Category: Member News

Call for Papers: Coordinating Cartographic Collections

On 30 September 2021 the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography is organizing the online workshop “Coordinating Cartographic Collections”, in conjunction with the 12th Virginia Garrett Lectures on the History of Cartography (University of Texas at Arlington) and the Fall Meeting of the Texas Map Society.

The ICA Workshop, due to the varying international Covid19 situation and travel restrictions, will be an ONLINE EVENT. The 12th Virginia Garrett Lectures & Fall Meeting of the Texas Map Society, however, are planned as a HYBRID CONFERENCE from 1 to 3 October 2021 (in-person attendance and online streaming). Presenters and registered participants of the ICA Workshop will get FREE online access to this conference as well.

Call for Papers

All three connected events are exploring the incredibly diverse cosmos of maps in collections. The ICA Workshop invites personal and institutional case studies / best practice examples on the following topics (though other contributions will be considered as well):

  • collecting (trade and collector)
  • cataloguing
  • preserving
  • presenting (physical and digital)
  • access / user perspectives
  • managing (back office)

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 30 July 2021
Notification of acceptance: 13 August 2021
Guidance on abstracts: min. 200 words – max. 500 words, add a brief biographical note

Inquiries and submissions should be directed to:
Prof. Dr. Imre Josef DemhardtChair ICA Commission on the History of Cartography

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Issue 7.1, 2021 of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

Cover International Journal of CartographyThe new issue of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

The contents of the issue are:

  • Editorial: Maps – essential information resources for integration, analysis and informing   William Cartwright & Anne Ruas
  • A year like no other – the ICA during the pandemic   Tim Trainor
  • The 1705 van Delft expedition to northern Australia: a toponymic perspective   Jan Tent
  • Famous charts and forgotten fragments: exploring correlations in early Portuguese nautical cartography   Bruno Almeida
  • Strengthening resilience in the Caribbean region through the Spatial Data Infrastructures   Paloma Merodio Gómez, Efrain Limones García & Andrea Ramírez Santiago
  • Minimum-error world map projections defined by polydimensional meshes   Justin H. Kunimune
  • Automating and utilising equal-distribution data classification   Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Ibad Kureshi, Kieran Lee, Ian Smith & Toni Staykova
  • Maps in History: Fighting Epidemics   Imre Josef Demhardt

Editorial: Maps – essential information resources for integration, analysis and informing

We currently live in a most awful time.  We are threatened by an invisible killer that we, as individuals and communities, must work hard to avoid, eliminate and, hopefully, eradicate.  To help us to better understand our local situation, about infections nearby, and the global situation we, as individuals, can source information from both local and global news services and publications.  This information that informs us generally includes infographics and maps.  These graphical, and geo-graphical information communication methods support and enhance the information that we mostly receive through the written word and tabulated number counts.

Data provided by  esteemed medical research facilities and governmental agencies are the sources for mapped information. For example, The New York Times provides information on the COVID-19 virus information via their ‘Coronavirus World map: Tracking the Global Outbreak” website.  Infographics and maps (generated via Mapbox), includes global information on hot spots, total cases, deaths and virus cases per capita (country-by-country).  The site brings-together information from local governments, The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at John Hopkins University, the National Health Commission of the PRC and the Wold Health Organisation. And, for the USA, the newspaper provides similar virus-related data (again using infographics and maps) on a state-by-state and county basis: trends in virus growth, vaccine rollout figures and the national situation generally.  This is repeated in a similar fashion by other major internationally-respected newspapers, as well as news services like Bloomberg, Reuters, BBC, CNN and France 24.   As well, our local newspapers and television news reports provide similar, more focussed information.  Maps are prominent in these news stories and reports, and they are used to inform us about the geographical reach of COVID-19.

It’s times like these that we need to better understand the impact of COVID-19 and the efforts being made to confront this challenge to humanity. Mapping has, and is, playing a major role for information collection, integration, analysis and informing. This utilisation of contemporary mapping services, whereby data can be sourced globally, and then presented to citizens, via print or digital media, illustrates the power of these mediums to better provide tools for decision-makers and to inform the general public.

In this issue, as part of the on-going column: Maps in history, Imre Demhardt provides some context about the use of maps as a tool for managing epidemics and developing strategic responses and spatially-informed strategies in his contribution,  ‘Fighting Epidemics’.  Professor Demhardt notes in his article that it wasn’t until the seventeenth century that printed maps were used as a tool to fight epidemics.  He provides examples from Bari on the Apulian coast of the Adriatic in the then Kingdom of Naples in 1690, New York City in 1795 and 1797 and London, 1849 and 1854.  This piece illustrates the usefulness of maps, historically, and we can reflect upon their usefulness today.

Other papers in this edition include a contribution from Jan Trent  – The 1705 van Delft expedition to northern Australia: A toponymic perspective.  The paper outlines the 1705 voyage of Dutch explorer Maerten van Delft, and the examination of the subsequent manuscript chart and report by two Councillors of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in Batavia. The paper reports on the findings of research that was undertaken to compare the differences between the two historic records and motivations behind the naming of locations.

Bruno Almeida provides another historically-focussed paper – Famous Charts and Forgotten Fragments: Exploring Correlations in Early Portuguese Nautical Cartography.  Research was undertaken to ascertain the links between two anonymous early sixteenth century portolan charts: the portolan chart at the Bibliothèque Municipale of Dijon and a fragment of a chart from the Archive at Torre do Tombo, Lisbon.  As well, the research investigated the links between these two charts and the Kunstmann III chart.  This was completed using a comparative study and cartometric methods to access their implicit geometry.

Strengthening resilience in the Caribbean region through the spatial data infrastructures, by Andrea Paloma Merodio Gómez, Efrain Limones García & Andrea Ramírez Santiago provides information relating to the methodology and the results from the assessment of the initial status of the SDIs of the member of the Association of Caribbean States.  The research undertaken also assessed the activities carried out for Strengthening these National SDIs, user satisfaction of improvements that had been made and provided recommendations for strengthening the use of geospatial information for regional decision-making.

Justin H. Kunimune, in his paper Minimum-error world map projections defined by polydimensional meshes, presents a method that uses multi-dimensional optimization to optimize piecewise map projections, based on interpolation onto unstructured meshes.  These map projections are presented as the Danseiji projections, along with their potential applications. The results of the research reported are demonstrated using several new map projections. These map projections are presented as the Danseiji projections, along with their potential applications.

Equal-distribution data classification for studying relationships between spatial phenomena, is contributed by Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Ibad Kureshi, Kieran Lee, Ian Smith and Toni Staykova.  The paper outlines and develops their proposal of a data classification method for choropleth maps that defines intervals so that some quantity represented by values of another attribute is equally distributed among the classes. They consider that this approach may be most useful when the distribution of the phenomenon is very unequal, with many data items having zero or low quantities and quite a few items having larger quantities.  The method developed is demonstrated by analysing data that referred to a set of spatially distributed people (patients) in relationship to characteristics of the areas where they are domiciled.

William Cartwright, Melbourne, Australia
Anne Ruas, Paris, France
Editors, International Journal of Cartography

Category: General News

ICA News 75 now online

ICA News, Number 75, December 2020

We are pleased to announce that the 75th issue of the ICA News is now available for download:

This issue of ICA News brings you another update on ICC 2021, reports on the meeting of ICA Executive Committee with chairs of the ICA Commissions and Working Groups, and farewells Keith Smith, National Secretary of the Mapping Sciences Institute Australia. Thank you again for your continuous support and contributions.

– Igor Drecki, Editor ICA News

Category: General News
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Congress of Cartographic Science successfully held as virtual congress

The 10th Congress of Cartographic Science “The challenge of cartography as an element of territorial management” planned to take place in Resistencia, Argentina, was held as the 1st Virtual International Congress on 4–6 November 2020.

This event, which is biannual in nature, was organized by the Argentine Center of Cartography and the Faculty of Humanities of the National University of the Northeast of the Argentine Republic and its main objective was to contribute to the dissemination of activities, projects and research related to knowledge and cartographic work based on geographic information of a different nature due to its objectives, capture scale and recipients.

Throughout its three long days, the work has been very intense due to the amount and diversity of activities: conferences, scientific papers, technical exhibitions, virtual cafes, posters, awards, etc.

The congress summoned a total of 622 attendees, of which 261 were students and 183 guests. They were connected to the virtual transmission through the YouTube channel, with an average of 200 participants per day, from the 23 Argentine provinces and 14 countries: Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Mexico, Spain, Hungary and the United States.

The transmissions were made live from the city of Resistencia in the province of Chaco, and were broadcast on the YouTube channel of the Congress of Cartographic Science, where they were recorded for public viewing. This meant a total of 33 hours of live transmission, and more than 5,900 reproductions of the 3 days on the YouTube channel so far.

Simultaneously, 6 Virtual Cafes were held with topics such as: Teacher Education and Training, Collaborative Cartography, Fires, Land Cover and Use, Geographical Names, and Climate Change. An average of 20 participants accessed them, and a total of about 100 people got in touch by this means.

For more information visit https://centrodecartografia.wixsite.com/10ccc/resultadofinal

Category: Member News

Selection of a theme for the Barbara Petchenik Competitions 2021 & 2023

Every four years, the ICA Commission on Cartography and Children is responsible for the selection of a theme for the next two Barbara Petchenik Competitions. In 2016, the decision was practically automatic: we opted for supporting the International Map Year using the motto “We love maps” in the competitions organized in 2017 and 2019.

This year the commission decided to organize a voting process to select a new theme. First, members and colleagues were asked to propose themes for the competitions. In almost three weeks, 69 proposals arrived from 17 countries. An online voting slip was created with Google Forms and all the commission members, colleagues from other ICA commissions and interested people in general participated in the voting process from May 15 to June 15, 2020. The voting process was announced not only by e-mail for all the ICA commissions, but also on the Facebook profile of the commission to ensure a wider participation. In four weeks, 132 colleagues gave their votes to max. five themes. The theme that finished in the first place was “A map of my future world” with 41 votes. This is one of the themes submitted by Liqiu Meng, current ICA Vice-president, from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. Consequently, “The map of my future world” will be the theme for the next two competitions in 2021 and 2023.

The second place was occupied by “Mapping for Hope” (submitted by Alexander Kent, UK) with 29 votes and the third place by “The changing world” and “With a map I can…!” (sent by Giedré Beconyté, from Lithuania and the Argentine Center of Cartography respectively) with 26 votes.

The next step will be to officially open the Barbara Petchenik Competition 2021, sending the Call for the competition and other documents next September.

The Commission on Cartography and Children would like to express our deepest thanks to all the colleagues who submitted themes and to all who voted in the last four weeks.

José Jesús Reyes Nuñez
Commission on Cartography and Children, Vice-Chair

The voting process to select a theme for the Barbara Pechetnik Competitions 2021 & 2023 started

The ICA Commission on Cartography and Children invites all of you to participate in the voting process to select a theme for the Barbara Petchenik Competitions in 2021 and 2023. Colleagues and institutions of 17 countries proposed sixty-nine (69) themes during the last weeks. An online voting slip was created using Google Forms, which you can access on the following address:

https://forms.gle/wAWBCXPrbgRfLXov5

The submitted themes are listed in the same order in which they were sent for us. Please, give your vote to max. 5 themes and vote only once. The deadline for sending your votes is June 15, 2020. After finishing the voting process we will make public the selected theme with the results of the vote.

Feel you free to contact us on the following e-mail address if you have any question or doubt: jesusreyes@caesar.elte.hu

Thank you so much for your contribution!

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