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Call for Papers: Coordinating Cartographic Collections

On 30 September 2021 the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography is organizing the online workshop “Coordinating Cartographic Collections”, in conjunction with the 12th Virginia Garrett Lectures on the History of Cartography (University of Texas at Arlington) and the Fall Meeting of the Texas Map Society.

The ICA Workshop, due to the varying international Covid19 situation and travel restrictions, will be an ONLINE EVENT. The 12th Virginia Garrett Lectures & Fall Meeting of the Texas Map Society, however, are planned as a HYBRID CONFERENCE from 1 to 3 October 2021 (in-person attendance and online streaming). Presenters and registered participants of the ICA Workshop will get FREE online access to this conference as well.

Call for Papers

All three connected events are exploring the incredibly diverse cosmos of maps in collections. The ICA Workshop invites personal and institutional case studies / best practice examples on the following topics (though other contributions will be considered as well):

  • collecting (trade and collector)
  • cataloguing
  • preserving
  • presenting (physical and digital)
  • access / user perspectives
  • managing (back office)

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 30 July 2021
Notification of acceptance: 13 August 2021
Guidance on abstracts: min. 200 words – max. 500 words, add a brief biographical note

Inquiries and submissions should be directed to:
Prof. Dr. Imre Josef DemhardtChair ICA Commission on the History of Cartography

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Issue 7.1, 2021 of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

Cover International Journal of CartographyThe new issue of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

The contents of the issue are:

  • Editorial: Maps – essential information resources for integration, analysis and informing   William Cartwright & Anne Ruas
  • A year like no other – the ICA during the pandemic   Tim Trainor
  • The 1705 van Delft expedition to northern Australia: a toponymic perspective   Jan Tent
  • Famous charts and forgotten fragments: exploring correlations in early Portuguese nautical cartography   Bruno Almeida
  • Strengthening resilience in the Caribbean region through the Spatial Data Infrastructures   Paloma Merodio Gómez, Efrain Limones García & Andrea Ramírez Santiago
  • Minimum-error world map projections defined by polydimensional meshes   Justin H. Kunimune
  • Automating and utilising equal-distribution data classification   Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Ibad Kureshi, Kieran Lee, Ian Smith & Toni Staykova
  • Maps in History: Fighting Epidemics   Imre Josef Demhardt

Editorial: Maps – essential information resources for integration, analysis and informing

We currently live in a most awful time.  We are threatened by an invisible killer that we, as individuals and communities, must work hard to avoid, eliminate and, hopefully, eradicate.  To help us to better understand our local situation, about infections nearby, and the global situation we, as individuals, can source information from both local and global news services and publications.  This information that informs us generally includes infographics and maps.  These graphical, and geo-graphical information communication methods support and enhance the information that we mostly receive through the written word and tabulated number counts.

Data provided by  esteemed medical research facilities and governmental agencies are the sources for mapped information. For example, The New York Times provides information on the COVID-19 virus information via their ‘Coronavirus World map: Tracking the Global Outbreak” website.  Infographics and maps (generated via Mapbox), includes global information on hot spots, total cases, deaths and virus cases per capita (country-by-country).  The site brings-together information from local governments, The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at John Hopkins University, the National Health Commission of the PRC and the Wold Health Organisation. And, for the USA, the newspaper provides similar virus-related data (again using infographics and maps) on a state-by-state and county basis: trends in virus growth, vaccine rollout figures and the national situation generally.  This is repeated in a similar fashion by other major internationally-respected newspapers, as well as news services like Bloomberg, Reuters, BBC, CNN and France 24.   As well, our local newspapers and television news reports provide similar, more focussed information.  Maps are prominent in these news stories and reports, and they are used to inform us about the geographical reach of COVID-19.

It’s times like these that we need to better understand the impact of COVID-19 and the efforts being made to confront this challenge to humanity. Mapping has, and is, playing a major role for information collection, integration, analysis and informing. This utilisation of contemporary mapping services, whereby data can be sourced globally, and then presented to citizens, via print or digital media, illustrates the power of these mediums to better provide tools for decision-makers and to inform the general public.

In this issue, as part of the on-going column: Maps in history, Imre Demhardt provides some context about the use of maps as a tool for managing epidemics and developing strategic responses and spatially-informed strategies in his contribution,  ‘Fighting Epidemics’.  Professor Demhardt notes in his article that it wasn’t until the seventeenth century that printed maps were used as a tool to fight epidemics.  He provides examples from Bari on the Apulian coast of the Adriatic in the then Kingdom of Naples in 1690, New York City in 1795 and 1797 and London, 1849 and 1854.  This piece illustrates the usefulness of maps, historically, and we can reflect upon their usefulness today.

Other papers in this edition include a contribution from Jan Trent  – The 1705 van Delft expedition to northern Australia: A toponymic perspective.  The paper outlines the 1705 voyage of Dutch explorer Maerten van Delft, and the examination of the subsequent manuscript chart and report by two Councillors of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in Batavia. The paper reports on the findings of research that was undertaken to compare the differences between the two historic records and motivations behind the naming of locations.

Bruno Almeida provides another historically-focussed paper – Famous Charts and Forgotten Fragments: Exploring Correlations in Early Portuguese Nautical Cartography.  Research was undertaken to ascertain the links between two anonymous early sixteenth century portolan charts: the portolan chart at the Bibliothèque Municipale of Dijon and a fragment of a chart from the Archive at Torre do Tombo, Lisbon.  As well, the research investigated the links between these two charts and the Kunstmann III chart.  This was completed using a comparative study and cartometric methods to access their implicit geometry.

Strengthening resilience in the Caribbean region through the spatial data infrastructures, by Andrea Paloma Merodio Gómez, Efrain Limones García & Andrea Ramírez Santiago provides information relating to the methodology and the results from the assessment of the initial status of the SDIs of the member of the Association of Caribbean States.  The research undertaken also assessed the activities carried out for Strengthening these National SDIs, user satisfaction of improvements that had been made and provided recommendations for strengthening the use of geospatial information for regional decision-making.

Justin H. Kunimune, in his paper Minimum-error world map projections defined by polydimensional meshes, presents a method that uses multi-dimensional optimization to optimize piecewise map projections, based on interpolation onto unstructured meshes.  These map projections are presented as the Danseiji projections, along with their potential applications. The results of the research reported are demonstrated using several new map projections. These map projections are presented as the Danseiji projections, along with their potential applications.

Equal-distribution data classification for studying relationships between spatial phenomena, is contributed by Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Ibad Kureshi, Kieran Lee, Ian Smith and Toni Staykova.  The paper outlines and develops their proposal of a data classification method for choropleth maps that defines intervals so that some quantity represented by values of another attribute is equally distributed among the classes. They consider that this approach may be most useful when the distribution of the phenomenon is very unequal, with many data items having zero or low quantities and quite a few items having larger quantities.  The method developed is demonstrated by analysing data that referred to a set of spatially distributed people (patients) in relationship to characteristics of the areas where they are domiciled.

William Cartwright, Melbourne, Australia
Anne Ruas, Paris, France
Editors, International Journal of Cartography

Category: General News

ICA News 75 now online

ICA News, Number 75, December 2020

We are pleased to announce that the 75th issue of the ICA News is now available for download:

This issue of ICA News brings you another update on ICC 2021, reports on the meeting of ICA Executive Committee with chairs of the ICA Commissions and Working Groups, and farewells Keith Smith, National Secretary of the Mapping Sciences Institute Australia. Thank you again for your continuous support and contributions.

– Igor Drecki, Editor ICA News

Category: General News
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Congress of Cartographic Science successfully held as virtual congress

The 10th Congress of Cartographic Science “The challenge of cartography as an element of territorial management” planned to take place in Resistencia, Argentina, was held as the 1st Virtual International Congress on 4–6 November 2020.

This event, which is biannual in nature, was organized by the Argentine Center of Cartography and the Faculty of Humanities of the National University of the Northeast of the Argentine Republic and its main objective was to contribute to the dissemination of activities, projects and research related to knowledge and cartographic work based on geographic information of a different nature due to its objectives, capture scale and recipients.

Throughout its three long days, the work has been very intense due to the amount and diversity of activities: conferences, scientific papers, technical exhibitions, virtual cafes, posters, awards, etc.

The congress summoned a total of 622 attendees, of which 261 were students and 183 guests. They were connected to the virtual transmission through the YouTube channel, with an average of 200 participants per day, from the 23 Argentine provinces and 14 countries: Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Mexico, Spain, Hungary and the United States.

The transmissions were made live from the city of Resistencia in the province of Chaco, and were broadcast on the YouTube channel of the Congress of Cartographic Science, where they were recorded for public viewing. This meant a total of 33 hours of live transmission, and more than 5,900 reproductions of the 3 days on the YouTube channel so far.

Simultaneously, 6 Virtual Cafes were held with topics such as: Teacher Education and Training, Collaborative Cartography, Fires, Land Cover and Use, Geographical Names, and Climate Change. An average of 20 participants accessed them, and a total of about 100 people got in touch by this means.

For more information visit https://centrodecartografia.wixsite.com/10ccc/resultadofinal

Category: Member News

Selection of a theme for the Barbara Petchenik Competitions 2021 & 2023

Every four years, the ICA Commission on Cartography and Children is responsible for the selection of a theme for the next two Barbara Petchenik Competitions. In 2016, the decision was practically automatic: we opted for supporting the International Map Year using the motto “We love maps” in the competitions organized in 2017 and 2019.

This year the commission decided to organize a voting process to select a new theme. First, members and colleagues were asked to propose themes for the competitions. In almost three weeks, 69 proposals arrived from 17 countries. An online voting slip was created with Google Forms and all the commission members, colleagues from other ICA commissions and interested people in general participated in the voting process from May 15 to June 15, 2020. The voting process was announced not only by e-mail for all the ICA commissions, but also on the Facebook profile of the commission to ensure a wider participation. In four weeks, 132 colleagues gave their votes to max. five themes. The theme that finished in the first place was “A map of my future world” with 41 votes. This is one of the themes submitted by Liqiu Meng, current ICA Vice-president, from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. Consequently, “The map of my future world” will be the theme for the next two competitions in 2021 and 2023.

The second place was occupied by “Mapping for Hope” (submitted by Alexander Kent, UK) with 29 votes and the third place by “The changing world” and “With a map I can…!” (sent by Giedré Beconyté, from Lithuania and the Argentine Center of Cartography respectively) with 26 votes.

The next step will be to officially open the Barbara Petchenik Competition 2021, sending the Call for the competition and other documents next September.

The Commission on Cartography and Children would like to express our deepest thanks to all the colleagues who submitted themes and to all who voted in the last four weeks.

José Jesús Reyes Nuñez
Commission on Cartography and Children, Vice-Chair

The voting process to select a theme for the Barbara Pechetnik Competitions 2021 & 2023 started

The ICA Commission on Cartography and Children invites all of you to participate in the voting process to select a theme for the Barbara Petchenik Competitions in 2021 and 2023. Colleagues and institutions of 17 countries proposed sixty-nine (69) themes during the last weeks. An online voting slip was created using Google Forms, which you can access on the following address:

https://forms.gle/wAWBCXPrbgRfLXov5

The submitted themes are listed in the same order in which they were sent for us. Please, give your vote to max. 5 themes and vote only once. The deadline for sending your votes is June 15, 2020. After finishing the voting process we will make public the selected theme with the results of the vote.

Feel you free to contact us on the following e-mail address if you have any question or doubt: jesusreyes@caesar.elte.hu

Thank you so much for your contribution!

News about the Barbara Petchenik Competition

Music video with maps submitted to previous competitions

Some days ago a Spanish ethnomusicologist, pedagogue and composer, Polo Vallejo (Pedagogy Professor in the Superior School of Music Reina Sofía, Madrid) asked for permission to use some of the map drawings made by children for the Barbara Petchenik competition in a short music video. His idea was to accompany maps made by children with a children xylophone piece of Carl Orff (German composer). Permission was given and the video is now available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsetAhhMSNE

The video is used as a greeting card directed to music associations all over the world.

The ICA Commission on Cartography and Children would like to thank Polo Vallejo for this lovely pre-Easter gift!

Selecting a new theme for the next competitions

Next September the International Cartographic Association (ICA), represented by the Commission on Cartography and Children plans to announce the Barbara Petchenik Competition 2021. In 2016 we decided to support the International Map Year using “We love maps” as theme for the competitions in 2017 and 2019. Now it is time to select a new theme for the competitions to be held in 2021 and 2023. We asked by e-mail all the members and supporters of ICA Commissions, all the representatives of ICA member nations, all the representatives and members of sister organizations and all colleagues in general to propose themes for the next two competitions. The organizers of the competition are open to any theme that can be represented by children on their maps. As help, here we list some of the themes selected for previous competitions: “Save the Earth”, “Many nations, one world”, “Living in a globalized world” and “My place in today’s world”.

We would ask colleagues to send their proposals to the jesusreyes@caesar.elte.hu e-mail address at latest on May 15. After the deadline, the commission is going to organize a voting process on the web, asking colleagues to vote their preferred themes and according to the number of votes, we select only one theme for the Barbara Petchenik Competitions in 2021 and 2023.

If you wish to have more detailed information about the Barbara Petchenik Competition, please visit the sites: https://icaci.org/petchenik/, https://childrensmaps.library.carleton.ca/ or http://lazarus.elte.hu/ccc/2019icc/bpcrules2019.pdf

 

José Jesús Reyes Nunez
Commission on Cartography and Children, Vice-Chair

Workshop on Automatic Vectorisation of Historical Maps held as virtual conference

On 13th March, the Commission on Cartographic Heritage into the Digital had its workshop on the Automatic Vectorisation of Historical Maps. Due to the coronavirus situation the workshop had to be held online only. Despite the short time (the meeting ban at the hosting institution was announced only 3 days before the event) most authors managed to join the meeting. The workshop was streamed online, the discussion was realized in a chat group.

Atlases in Time – Joint Commission Meeting in Madrid 2020 postponed to October

Please note: Due to the very uncertain situation caused by the emergence of the Corona virus, the local organizing committee together with the commission chairs decided to postpone the meeting in Madrid (original date: 22.–25. April).

The new date of the Joint Commission Meeting in Madrid will be 14.–17. October (Wed–Sat).

Further information is available through the Madrid2020 conference website: https://map-service.de/madrid2020/

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