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Special Issue: Cartographers write about Cartography, International Journal of Cartography – complete issue published on-line

Cover International Journal of CartographyThe new issue of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

 

Editorial: Cartographers Write About Cartography

The year 2020, and the COVID-19 virus presented challenges for communities worldwide.  Our Cartography and GIScience international ‘family’ was not immune to the impacts of health issues, movement restrictions and the need to operate altogether differently to what we had done in the past.  One of the impacts of restricted travel has been the re-scheduling of the ICA conference ICC2021 from June to December 2021. At the time of writing there’s hope, but not yet certainty that we can meet in person in December.

We thought that we would ‘re-position’ one of the issues of the International Journal of Cartography to provide a way that members of our international community could continue discourse about our discipline during this ‘hiatus’ in face-to-face international cartographic activities.

We have therefore allocated this second edition (7.2) for 2021 to a series of ‘invited essays’, where we invited a number of Cartographers to write about Cartography – personal essays on a particular map, geospatial product, or cartographic issue.  We (deliberately) asked invited contributors to write a short, illustrated essay, rather than a formal paper, so as to be able to express the qualities they saw as being important in a particular artefact. These are very much personal reflections.

We were interested in developing a publication that explored what we think about certain maps that move and inspire us – as cartographers and designers, as geospatial scientists and geographers.

When we look at some maps or atlases we sometimes just ‘like them’, or think they ‘work’.  They are something special.  They can work, artistically, scientifically, technically – or in all three of these areas. We generally limit our appreciation to some ‘note to self’ or by commenting about the artefact we admire to a close friend or colleague, or by a brief comment on social media.  We very rarely express our longer-form thoughts about them to a wider audience.

We believe that this Special Issue has provided the vehicle for this to occur, at least for the small proportion of cartographic works on show.

The authors that contributed to this Special Issue of the Journal were asked to pen a personal illustrated essay. We asked them to explain why their chosen map or cartographic artefact works and to provide an analysis of the attributes of the product that they believed make it successful.  Here, they were asked to emphasise why it works, even though this was perhaps a personal viewpoint, unsupported by analytical research.  If in fact why it works cannot be pinpointed, the author’s personal viewpoint was sought. (Our thinking was that maybe what they were writing about was considered to be like a piece of art – “it’s just great, but I don’t know why it works”.)

When compiling our list of ‘invitees’ we were faced with a dilemma: our discipline is one that is rich with well-respected, talented and innovative researchers and practitioners.  Looking at what they have done, and continue to do, is truly amazing.  We would have liked to invite them all!  However, our issue page limit disallowed this. So, we invited potential contributors to enable a representation of  the diverse nature of the areas of endeavour in our field, hailing from many parts of the globe, being at different stages of their careers and, importantly for us, as editors, be willing to join us on this journey.  We are glad to report that we received much interest and encouragement from invited authors, who were keen to share their passion for maps, in their many forms and applications.  The enthusiastic support from contributors confirmed our thinking that an issue like this, with a focus on personal observations of maps, would make a wonderful vehicle for promoting conversations about our field of endeavour.

We believe that this collection of essays will make an important contribution to the contemporary literature on cartography and GI science and promote discourse on these maps and cartographic artefacts. We hope it will generate pleasure and stimulate creativity. Further, that in exploring cartographic work in this way we might encourage similar approaches to other work, acknowledging the value of personal perspectives and opinion as much as scholarly critique. Both have value.

William Cartwright, Melbourne, Australia
Anne Ruas, Paris, France
Kenneth Field, Redlands, United States of America
Editors, International Journal of Cartography Special Issue – Cartographers write about Cartography

The contents of the issue are:

  • Editorial: Cartographers Write About Cartography by William Cartwright, Anne Ruas and Kenneth Field
  • The Heart of the Grand Canyon by Tom Patterson
  • OCTOPUS MAPPING one of the MADMAPS: NATO Octopus, control over the weapons’ sales by Christine Zanin and Nicolas Lambert
  • The Mediterranean Basin Map Designed by Michel Morel by Anne Ruas
  • Peeling back the layers of a school wall map: Brunhes-Deffontaines “France Forestière” by Nicholas Chrisman
  • The Unicorn of Map Projections by Sarah Battersby
  • Reinhard Maack and the Brandberg (Namibia) by Imre Demhardt
  • Linear and Painterly Expression in Topographic Works of Art during the Enlightenment by Beata Medyńska-Gulij
  • UNVEILING SOUTHERN AFRICA: JOHN BARROW’S MAP OF 1801 by Elri Liebenburg
  • Reorienting the Narrative: Chapin Jr.’s “Red China” Map by Ian Muehlenhaus
  • The Geologic Map of the Cassini Quadrangle on the Moon: Planetary Cartography Between Science, Efficacy and Cartographic Aesthetics by Andrea Naß and Stephan van Gasselt
  • Revealing the value of geospatial information with isochrone maps for improving the management of heart attacks in South Africa by Serena Coetzee, Lourens Snyman and Rhena Delport
  • Map as biography: maps, memory, and landscape – thoughts on Ordnance Survey map, Sheet TR04, 1:25,000 Provisional Edition, Ashford. by Peter Vujakovic
  • Interactive Videodiscs: Beginnings of Multimedia and Catalyst for Multimedia Cartography by William Cartwright
  • The best map ever? by Menno-Jan Kraak
  • Cartography Is Here. [full stop] by Igor Drecki
  • My first Atlas by Carla Cristina Reinaldo Gimenes de Sena
    Graphical-statistical Atlas of Switzerland, 1914 by Thomas Schultz
  • Matthew Picton’s Urban Narratives. Or how a three-dimensional paper map can beam you into the London bombing nights of 1940 by Thomas Streifeneder and Barbara Piatti
  • Seeing the “perfect world” through Heinrich Berann’s Panorama Maps of the Alps by Georg Gartner
  • The Soviet Military 1:10,000 City Plan of Dover, UK (1974) by Alexander Kent
  • Reflections on the creation of cartographic expression through the representation of elevation by Takashi Morita
  • Separating fact from fiction: the mythology of cartographic icons by Kenneth Field
  • Measuring geodetic baselines in Spain during the 1850’s by Andrés Arístegui
  • MapQuest and the beginnings of Web Cartography by Michael Peterson

 

International Journal of Cartography
Special Issue: Cartographers write about Cartography
Number 2 Volume 7 2021
ISSN:2372-9333

Category: General News

Issue 7.1, 2021 of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

Cover International Journal of CartographyThe new issue of the International Journal of Cartography is now published online

The contents of the issue are:

  • Editorial: Maps – essential information resources for integration, analysis and informing   William Cartwright & Anne Ruas
  • A year like no other – the ICA during the pandemic   Tim Trainor
  • The 1705 van Delft expedition to northern Australia: a toponymic perspective   Jan Tent
  • Famous charts and forgotten fragments: exploring correlations in early Portuguese nautical cartography   Bruno Almeida
  • Strengthening resilience in the Caribbean region through the Spatial Data Infrastructures   Paloma Merodio Gómez, Efrain Limones García & Andrea Ramírez Santiago
  • Minimum-error world map projections defined by polydimensional meshes   Justin H. Kunimune
  • Automating and utilising equal-distribution data classification   Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Ibad Kureshi, Kieran Lee, Ian Smith & Toni Staykova
  • Maps in History: Fighting Epidemics   Imre Josef Demhardt

Editorial: Maps – essential information resources for integration, analysis and informing

We currently live in a most awful time.  We are threatened by an invisible killer that we, as individuals and communities, must work hard to avoid, eliminate and, hopefully, eradicate.  To help us to better understand our local situation, about infections nearby, and the global situation we, as individuals, can source information from both local and global news services and publications.  This information that informs us generally includes infographics and maps.  These graphical, and geo-graphical information communication methods support and enhance the information that we mostly receive through the written word and tabulated number counts.

Data provided by  esteemed medical research facilities and governmental agencies are the sources for mapped information. For example, The New York Times provides information on the COVID-19 virus information via their ‘Coronavirus World map: Tracking the Global Outbreak” website.  Infographics and maps (generated via Mapbox), includes global information on hot spots, total cases, deaths and virus cases per capita (country-by-country).  The site brings-together information from local governments, The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at John Hopkins University, the National Health Commission of the PRC and the Wold Health Organisation. And, for the USA, the newspaper provides similar virus-related data (again using infographics and maps) on a state-by-state and county basis: trends in virus growth, vaccine rollout figures and the national situation generally.  This is repeated in a similar fashion by other major internationally-respected newspapers, as well as news services like Bloomberg, Reuters, BBC, CNN and France 24.   As well, our local newspapers and television news reports provide similar, more focussed information.  Maps are prominent in these news stories and reports, and they are used to inform us about the geographical reach of COVID-19.

It’s times like these that we need to better understand the impact of COVID-19 and the efforts being made to confront this challenge to humanity. Mapping has, and is, playing a major role for information collection, integration, analysis and informing. This utilisation of contemporary mapping services, whereby data can be sourced globally, and then presented to citizens, via print or digital media, illustrates the power of these mediums to better provide tools for decision-makers and to inform the general public.

In this issue, as part of the on-going column: Maps in history, Imre Demhardt provides some context about the use of maps as a tool for managing epidemics and developing strategic responses and spatially-informed strategies in his contribution,  ‘Fighting Epidemics’.  Professor Demhardt notes in his article that it wasn’t until the seventeenth century that printed maps were used as a tool to fight epidemics.  He provides examples from Bari on the Apulian coast of the Adriatic in the then Kingdom of Naples in 1690, New York City in 1795 and 1797 and London, 1849 and 1854.  This piece illustrates the usefulness of maps, historically, and we can reflect upon their usefulness today.

Other papers in this edition include a contribution from Jan Trent  – The 1705 van Delft expedition to northern Australia: A toponymic perspective.  The paper outlines the 1705 voyage of Dutch explorer Maerten van Delft, and the examination of the subsequent manuscript chart and report by two Councillors of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in Batavia. The paper reports on the findings of research that was undertaken to compare the differences between the two historic records and motivations behind the naming of locations.

Bruno Almeida provides another historically-focussed paper – Famous Charts and Forgotten Fragments: Exploring Correlations in Early Portuguese Nautical Cartography.  Research was undertaken to ascertain the links between two anonymous early sixteenth century portolan charts: the portolan chart at the Bibliothèque Municipale of Dijon and a fragment of a chart from the Archive at Torre do Tombo, Lisbon.  As well, the research investigated the links between these two charts and the Kunstmann III chart.  This was completed using a comparative study and cartometric methods to access their implicit geometry.

Strengthening resilience in the Caribbean region through the spatial data infrastructures, by Andrea Paloma Merodio Gómez, Efrain Limones García & Andrea Ramírez Santiago provides information relating to the methodology and the results from the assessment of the initial status of the SDIs of the member of the Association of Caribbean States.  The research undertaken also assessed the activities carried out for Strengthening these National SDIs, user satisfaction of improvements that had been made and provided recommendations for strengthening the use of geospatial information for regional decision-making.

Justin H. Kunimune, in his paper Minimum-error world map projections defined by polydimensional meshes, presents a method that uses multi-dimensional optimization to optimize piecewise map projections, based on interpolation onto unstructured meshes.  These map projections are presented as the Danseiji projections, along with their potential applications. The results of the research reported are demonstrated using several new map projections. These map projections are presented as the Danseiji projections, along with their potential applications.

Equal-distribution data classification for studying relationships between spatial phenomena, is contributed by Gennady Andrienko, Natalia Andrienko, Ibad Kureshi, Kieran Lee, Ian Smith and Toni Staykova.  The paper outlines and develops their proposal of a data classification method for choropleth maps that defines intervals so that some quantity represented by values of another attribute is equally distributed among the classes. They consider that this approach may be most useful when the distribution of the phenomenon is very unequal, with many data items having zero or low quantities and quite a few items having larger quantities.  The method developed is demonstrated by analysing data that referred to a set of spatially distributed people (patients) in relationship to characteristics of the areas where they are domiciled.

William Cartwright, Melbourne, Australia
Anne Ruas, Paris, France
Editors, International Journal of Cartography

Category: General News

Call for Articles: “A Terrible Mother Of Invention” – Cartographic Progress during World War I (1914-18)

To commemorate the centenary of the end of what then was called the ‘Great War to end all wars’ (H.G. Wells 1914) from a cartographical perspective, the International Journal of Cartography (IJoC) has invited the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography to guest edit a special issue to appear in November 2018.

The emphasis of the special issue will be on how the first truly global and industrialized war helped to emerge new ways to capture survey data, speed up processing and printing and, last but not least, introducing significant map series. For that focus on technologies and resulting cartographic products, maps on diplomacy and propaganda are intentionally outside the scope of the special issue.

Alongside already solicited contributions the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography does invite expressions of interest by way of submitting brief abstracts on two categories of articles:

  • Overview papers of national scope (about 10-16 pages in print according to the IJoC guidelines on the manuscript) and
  • Papers on special topics (about 4-8 pages in print) either with a regional focus (e.g. the Gallipoli Campaign) or a topical focus (e.g. emergence of aeronautical charts).

For overview papers of national scope special consideration will be given to the following national cartographies of war:

  • United Kingdom (Western Front and other theatres of war)
  • France (Western Front and other theatres of war)
  • Russia (Eastern Europe and Caucasus Front)
  • Italy
  • Japan

To conceptualize a contribution please note that each page in the special issue equals about 700 words, will be printed in full color and that thus a half page size figure takes up about 350 words.

Abstracts should be up to 500 words, plus a brief biographical notice. Abstracts (and subsequently accepted articles) should be written in English.

Important dates

  • Deadline for submissions of abstracts: October 17, 2017
  • Notification of acceptance for the Special Issue: October 31, 2017
  • Deadline for submissions of manuscript, incl. all attachments (figures): March 31, 2018

All questions and submissions should be sent electronically to the guest editor: Prof. Dr. Imre Josef Demhardt (Chair of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography)

ICA Awards Ceremony at ICC2017

In the ICA Awards Ceremony at ICC2017, the following awards were presented in recognition of contributions to the ICA:

ICA Awardees 2017

From left to right: Igor Drecki, Cynthia Brewer, Timothy Trainor, Menno-Jan Kraak, Anne Ruas, William Cartwright, Matthew Rice, Aileen Buckley

ICA Honorary Fellowship

The ICA Honorary Fellowship is for cartographers of international reputation who have made special contribution to the ICA. It includes a bronze medal.

  • William Cartwright, Australia
  • Anne Ruas, France
    • Co-chair of the Commission on Generalization and Multiple Representation (2003–2007)
    • Vice-President (2007–2015)
    • President of ICC 2011, Paris
    • Editor of the International Journal of Cartography (2015–)
  • Timothy Trainor, USA
    • Chair or Co-chair of the Commission on National and Regional Atlases (1995–2007)
    • Chair of Census Cartography Working Group (2007–2011)
    • Vice-President (2007–2015)

Diplomas for outstanding services to ICA

The Diplomas for outstanding services to ICA are for colleagues who have made special contribution to the ICA as commission officers or conference organizers.

  • Igor Drecki, New Zealand
  • Aileen R. Buckley, USA
    • ICC2017 Organizing Committee member
  • Cynthia A. Brewer, USA
    • ICC2017 Organizing Committee member
  • Matthew Rice, USA
    • ICC2017 Organizing Committee member

 
Overview of ICA Awards presented at ICC2015

Congratulations to all awardees!

President’s Blog: ICA has its own journal! #icc2015

Georg Gartner presenting IJC

Photo by @sgk_swisscarto

At ICC2015 in Rio de Janeiro the International Journal of Cartography was officially launched!

In its sixth decade of existence, ICA has now its own outlet for scientific work. Together with Taylor & Francis, the two Editors-in-Chief Anne Ruas and William Cartwright presented the first issue in Rio.

Please check out the first issue, which is available online at tandfonline.com

And: Send us your results, papers and submissions!

President’s Blog: International Journal of Cartography (IJC)

Cover of the International Journal of CartographyThe International Cartographic Association (ICA) has partnered with Taylor and Francis to establish a new international journal that will promote research in the fields of Cartography and GI Science: The International Journal of Cartography (IJC).

The ICA sees this partnership and the provision of a quality international peer-reviewed journal as an important tool that will contribute to the ICA’s goal of advancing Cartography and GI Science.

The ICA has taken an initiative to establish the International Journal of Cartography (IJC) to provide the international research community with a vehicle to report and disseminate the outcomes of research in our wide field of endeavours.

The journal is co-edited by William Cartwright and Anne Ruas. It has 4 Associate Editors: Lynn Usery, Gennady Andrienko, Elri Liebenberg and Zhilin Li – and an international advisory board.

All submissions and reviewing for papers submitted to the International Journal of Cartography are handled electronically through the Taylor and Francis online facility. This facility manages the paper-handling process from submission, to review and revision to publishing.

To submit a manuscript for consideration, authors should access the journal website at: http://www.edmgr.com/tica/

Thank you in advance for your future support of the International Journal of Cartography!

– Georg Gartner

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